CORE News

Material Considerations: New Contact Lens Update Explores Future Contact Lens Technologies

 Issue #52 Showcases Biosensing and Integrated Displays;
Provides Advice on Scleral and Orthokeratology Materials for Immediate Use in Practice

Chau-Minh Phan

WATERLOO, Ontario, February 17, 2020—The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has published issue number 52 of its free online education magazine, Contact Lens Update. With contributions from experts in North America and Australia, the new edition explores multiple aspects of current and future contact lens material technologies.

In a provocative editorial, CORE research scientist and OcuBlink co-founder Chau-Minh Phan discusses ongoing research into biosensing contact lenses, noting the many and varied diseases that can be detected and monitored through tears. He also evaluates the Mojo smart lens, whose recent concept unveiling at the 2020 CES conference generated unprecedented worldwide attention from the technology and healthcare communities.

Alex Hui

Imagine being able to recommend a contact lens that contains an antihistamine to help with seasonal allergy symptoms. This technology is on the near horizon. Alex Hui, senior lecturer at the University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia, reviews a recent clinical study in patients with confirmed allergic responses who wore special drug-loaded contact lenses while exposed to allergens.

Langis Michaud

While the future is filled with intriguing advancements, the good news is that today’s eye care professionals do not have to wait for all new materials technologies. In a clinical insights story, Langis Michaud, professor at the University of Montreal, discusses the evolution of highly oxygen permeable materials for scleral and orthokeratology use. He shares research that can help increase the oxygen delivery of the scleral lens system, and practical advice that can be applied immediately for patient benefits.

Published six times per year, Contact Lens Update provides a global platform for unbiased clinical insights based in current research. Since 2011, each issue has provided dependable and up-to-date ocular health information for more than 60,000 leading eye care professionals.

In addition to a complete archive of back issues, ContactLensUpdate.com offers a resource library that provides no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images and video. It also houses complimentary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Industry professionals can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues.

The publication receives support from the educational arms of Alcon, CooperVision, and Johnson & Johnson Vision.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE

aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

CORE Announces Significantly Expanded Presence at 2020 Global Contact Lens Symposium

Dry Eye, Contact Lenses, Myopia Management and Instrumentation Sessions Highlights Organization’s Expertise in Specialty Segment

WATERLOO, Ontario, January 13, 2020—The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has announced its largest-ever participation in the upcoming Global Specialty Lens Symposium (GSLS). The annual conference is expected to attract prominent researchers, clinicians and educators from 35 countries later this month in Las Vegas.

“The range of CORE-led sessions on dry eye, contact lenses, myopia management and instrumentation across four days reflects how we have taken a markedly increased role in the specialty segment, which is growing more exciting by the year,” said CORE Director Lyndon Jones, PhD, DSc, FCOptom.

For the first time, GSLS is opening with two pre-meeting interactive workshops. “Contemporary Dry Eye Disease Practice” features CORE’s Dr. Jones and Karen Walsh, BSc(Hons), PGDip, MCOptom plus Aston University’s James Wolffsohn, MBA, PhD. The high-energy session, slated for Wednesday, January 22 at 6 p.m. PDT, showcases and demonstrates multiple elements that can be incorporated into diagnosis, treatment and ongoing management dry eye patients.

On Friday, January 24, Drs. Jones and Wolffsohn partner again in the 10 a.m. PDT general session to discuss “A Clear Vision on Dropouts.” Moderated by educator and consultant Eef van der Worp, BOptom, PhD, the presentation focuses on three aspects behind the dropout phenomenon to stabilize and increase the wearer base.

Later that day, Drs. Walsh and Jones bring attendees inside one of the latest diagnostic devices for the dry eye arsenal. “Working Smart: Streamline Your Dry Eye Practice with New Technology – Medmont” begins at 1:30 pm PDT.

On Saturday, January 25 at 9 a.m. PDT, “Dry Eye and Contact Lenses: Harmony or Havoc” pairs Drs. Jones and Walsh to review methods to determine if patients truly have dry eye disease, discuss various approaches used by companies to manage contact lens discomfort, and describe the science behind these approaches.

Just prior to the conference close, beginning at 2:20 p.m. PDT, a panel of prominent researchers addresses “A 2020 Vision on Specialty Lens Care.” Dr. Jones collaborates with Shalu Pal, OD, Kelsey Steele, OD, MS and Loretta Szczotka-Flynn OD, PhD—plus moderators Karen DeLoss, OD, and Dr. Van der Worp—to share academic and clinical viewpoints on best practices in specialty contact lens solutions, hygiene and handling.

In addition to its presentations, a CORE venture will be represented among the conference’s scientific posters. “Deposition of fluorescently tagged lysozyme on contact lenses in a physiological blink model” provides insights on daily disposable lenses using OcuBlink, the CORE-affiliated in vitro eye model that accelerates ophthalmic product research and development.

In parallel with GSLS, CORE Clinical Scientist Debbie Jones, BSc, FCOptom, will be a featured speaker at CooperVision’s annual Educator’s Meeting regarding the MiSight® 1 day contact lens clinical study for slowing the progression of myopia in children. CORE has been the largest site for the multi-year landmark study, which is now entering its seventh year.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

Putting Dry Eye Theory Into Practice: New Contact Lens Update Covers the Canadian Dry Eye Summit

Issue #51 Presents Key Learnings & Advice for Instant Application to Everyday Practice

WATERLOO, Ontario, December 16, 2019—The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has published issue number 51 of its free online education magazine, Contact Lens Update. For the first time, an entire edition has been dedicated to a single conference: the Canadian Dry Eye Summit, which was held in Toronto in mid-November.

“Clinical management of dry eye disease is front of mind for many practitioners as they explore building and expanding their contemporary evidence-based practice,” said Karen Walsh, CORE clinical scientist and Contact Lens Update editor. “We’re excited to bring the best of the Canadian Dry Eye Summit to professionals around the world through our newest issue.”

In its second year, the sold-out two-day conference delivered credible and practical education to nearly two hundred optometrists. Speakers ranged from authors of the Tear Film and Ocular Surface (TFOS) Society’s Dry Eye Workshop (DEWS) II report, to TFOS DEWS II global ambassadors, through to practitioners who are already successfully operating dry eye specialties in their businesses.

Key observations from the speakers are summarized in the editorial of this special edition along with a downloadable summary of the TFOS DEWS II diagnostic and treatment algorithms designed by CORE. The conference highlights section covers how to take steps to start or expand a dry eye practice. Nutrition and supplementation as they relate to dry eye are reviewed in the feature article, and a clinical insight focuses on the use of symptom questionnaires.

“We were delighted with the level of enthusiasm displayed by the practitioners attending the summit,” said Dr. Richard Maharaj, specialist dry eye practitioner and educational chair of the conference. “We hope the education shared will help practitioners to better serve their dry eye patients, and believe this collaboration with CORE and Contact Lens Update will help disseminate that information to a much wider audience. Dry eye practice is a rewarding area in which to specialize. I encourage any interested practitioners to read this edition of Contact Lens Update, to consider attending one of our two conference dates for 2020 in Vancouver and Toronto and to stay engaged with our online learning resource which is currently being developed.”

Published six times per year, Contact Lens Update provides a global platform for unbiased clinical insights based in current research. Since 2011, each issue has provided dependable and up-to-date ocular health information for more than 60,000 leading eye care professionals.

In addition to a complete archive of back issues, ContactLensUpdate.com offers a resource library that provides no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images and video. It also houses complimentary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Industry professionals can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues.

The publication receives support from the educational arms of CooperVision, Alcon and Johnson & Johnson Vision.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

CooperVision Signs on to Sponsor CORE’s Contact Lens Update

Bi-Monthly Digital Publication Helps Eye Care Professionals Advance Contact Lens Patient Care and Practice Success

SAN RAMON, Calif., December 3, 2019—Affirming its commitment to supporting eye care professionals (ECPs) worldwide through clinical education, CooperVision has become a sponsor of Contact Lens Update (contactlensupdate.com). Published six times per year by the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE), the digital magazine provides a global platform for unbiased clinical insights based in current research.

Since 2011, each issue has provided dependable and up-to-date ocular health information for more than 60,000 readers. November marked Contact Lens Update’s 50th edition, for which noted Australian optometrist and research scientist Paul Gifford was invited to guest curate content focused on orthokeratology.

“CooperVision is proud to become a sponsor of Contact Lens Update, reflecting our aligned objectives to share new developments with ECPs that help advance contact lens patient care and practice success,” said Gary Orsborn, OD, Vice President, Global Professional & Clinical Affairs for CooperVision. “We work closely with and consider CORE to be a key research partner. Contact Lens Update is known for aggregating new research findings and identifying key insights, translating ocular science for the benefit of contact lens clinical practice and wearers.”

“We’re delighted to have CooperVision partner with us in support of Contact Lens Update, ensuring its continued availability and evolution for tens of thousands of dedicated readers across six continents,” said Karen Walsh, MCOptom, CORE Clinical Scientist and the publication’s editor.

In addition to accessing a complete archive of back issues, ECPs can visit ContactLensUpdate.com’s resource library for no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images and video. The site also houses complementary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Clinicians, researchers and educators can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues.

# # #

About CooperVision

CooperVision, a unit of CooperCompanies (NYSE:COO), is one of the world’s leading manufacturers of soft contact lenses. The Company produces a full array of monthly, two-week and daily disposable contact lenses, all featuring advanced materials and optics. CooperVision has a strong heritage of solving the toughest vision challenges such as myopia, astigmatism and presbyopia; and offers the most complete collection of spherical, toric and multifocal products available. Through a combination of innovative products and focused practitioner support, the company brings a refreshing perspective to the marketplace, creating real advantages for customers and wearers. For more information, visit www.coopervision.com.

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

Media Contact

Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA
McDougall Communications for CooperVision
mike@mcdougallpr.com or +1-585-434-2150

Aimee J. Lewis
McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1-585-414-9838

CORE Celebrates the 50th Edition of Contact Lens Update; Orthokeratology Expert Paul Gifford Authors Special Edition

Latest Issue Designed for ECPs Interested in Ortho-K but Don’t Know Where to Start and for Those Seeking Updates on New Research in the Field

WATERLOO, Ontario, October 31, 2019—The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has published its 50th edition of Contact Lens Update. Since the first issue in 2011, the digital magazine has been translating latest global research into relevant, practical advice for eye care professionals.

“Feedback from subscribers shows more than nine out of ten practitioners say Contact Lens Update is a useful resource, provides relevant information and helps them stay informed1,” said Karen Walsh, CORE clinical scientist and its editor. “Given that track record, CORE is delighted to release the landmark 50th issue as a special edition focused on ortho-K.”

Paul Gifford, the noted Australian optometrist and research scientist specializing in ortho-K and myopia control, was invited by CORE to curate the special edition. His editorial is a comprehensive guide to getting started with ortho-K, covering basic theory, considerations about astigmatism, and how to select suitable patients for those first few fits.

The key takeaways from that editorial can be found in the free-to-download clinical insight practitioner factsheet. This has been designed as a handy, quick reference guide on how to take those first few steps in ortho-K fitting.

Paul’s feature article reviews the current evidence and ongoing work on the potential for delivering more effective myopia control through customized ortho-K lens design.

The conference highlight shares interim results from a current study examining the efficacy of combining ortho-K with pharmacological treatments.

“I am delighted to be given the opportunity to produce this special issue of Contact Lens Update,” said Gifford. “Practitioners are naturally interested in myopia control, and whilst many have heard of the results that can be achieved with ortho-K, they may not feel confident to start fitting the lenses themselves. My hope is the information we have produced will help them take those early, simple steps into the world of ortho-K”

Published six times per year, Contact Lens Update provides a global platform for unbiased clinical insights based in current research. Since 2011, each issue has provided dependable and up-to-date ocular health information for more than 60,000 leading eye care professionals.

In addition to a complete archive of back issues, ContactLensUpdate.com offers a resource library that provides no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images and video. It also houses complementary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Industry professionals can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues.

The publication receives support from the educational arms of CooperVision, Alcon and Johnson & Johnson Vision.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE

aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

 

Reference
1. Contact Lens Update annual survey, 2019. n=96, top 2 box, strongly agree/somewhat agree

CORE and Review of Myopia Management to Collaborate on Clinical and Educational Content

Review of Myopia Management to Share Content from Contact Lens Update, and CORE to Contribute Original Articles to Review of Myopia Management

WATERLOO, Ontario, October 30, 2019—The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) today announced a collaboration with Review of Myopia Management, published by Jobson Medical Information.

The collaboration has begun with Review of Myopia Management sharing content from CORE’s online clinical educational magazine, Contact Lens Update. Now available in the resources section of Review of Myopia Management are summaries of each of the International Myopia Institute (IMI) reports. Authored by members of CORE’s clinical science team, and originally appearing in issue 47 of Contact Lens Update, each provides a short summary key insights and recommendations from the reports. Links to the full IMI open-access papers are also available through both websites.

“The IMI reports were long-anticipated and much needed. In an evolving clinical field such as myopia management, it is of paramount importance that eye care professionals keep themselves informed to offer the best possible evidence-based therapies to their patients,” said Karen Walsh, Clinical Scientist and editor of Contact Lens Update. “The IMI reports contain a valuable summary of that evidence base as it currently stands. Content initiatives through Contact Lens Update and Review of Myopia Management help translate that information into practical advice for use in practice.”

Over the next 18 months, CORE scientists will also contribute original articles on key topics for Review of Myopia Management. Dr. Lyndon Jones, director of CORE, summarized the relevance of the initiative: “Recognising the worldwide epidemic of myopia, we value the opportunity to collaborate with partners such as Review of Myopia Management in order to increase opportunities for practitioners to access and evaluate new research, thinking and techniques.”

Published six times per year, Contact Lens Update provides a global platform for unbiased clinical insights based in current research. Since 2011, each issue has provided dependable and up-to-date ocular health information for more than 60,000 leading eye care professionals.

In addition to a complete archive of back issues, ContactLensUpdate.com offers a resource library that provides no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images, and video. It also houses complementary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Industry professionals can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues.

The Contact Lens Update  receives support from the educational arms of Alcon and Johnson & Johnson Vision.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE

aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

Researchers recommend considering preserved artificial tears for mild dry eyes

WATERLOO, Ontario, September 30, 2019—Evidence shows that there is a wide choice of preserved artificial tears which can be recommended within a larger treatment plan for mild to moderate dry eye disease.

According to researchers at the University of Waterloo, while preservative-free drops are best for severe dry eyes, they are not the only option to consider in the management of more mild stages of the disease.

“The preservative benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is known to irritate the surface of the eye and should be avoided in all dry eye patients, however, there is good evidence that alternatively preserved drops can be safely used in mild to moderate cases.” said Karen Walsh, a Clinical Scientist at Waterloo’s School of Optometry and Vision Science and the Centre for Ocular Research & Education. “Preservative-free drops can be more expensive, and many are packaged in single-dose containers that can be difficult for elderly patients to use.

“This study provides an important recommendation to eye care practitioners: they have more options for treating mild to moderate dry eye than they may think.”

As part of their research, Walsh and co-author Lyndon Jones, reviewed a range of studies including clinical trials and laboratory testing which showed that artificial tears containing alternative preservatives are significantly safer to the surface of the eye than BAK-preserved drops.

“It is important for patients with symptoms of dry eye to seek medical advice when choosing which drops are best. An examination with their eye care professional can diagnose the type and severity of dry eye, which will result in more effective treatment and ongoing management of the condition.” said Walsh.

This literature review, The use of preservatives in dry eye drops, authored by Walsh and Jones was recently published in the journal Clinical Ophthalmology.

OcuBall’s Polymer-Based Eye Model Replaces Animal-Based Methods for Foreign Body Removal; Eliminates Smell and BioHazards

WATERLOO, Ontario, August 14, 2019—Educators and professionals worldwide now have access to a novel eye model that replaces traditional animal-based methods for foreign body removal—a critically important skill for clinical practice. OcuBlink, Inc., has shipped its first order of OcuBall, a polymer-based eye model that can be used for training and in educational settings to perfect the removal of foreign bodies, while eliminating safety concerns related to handling, disposal and storage of biological tissue.

OcuBall’s inaugural order is being shipped to the Illinois College of Optometry where it will be used by optometry students to practice and gain confidence in the removal of materials from the eye, such as tiny pieces of metal from the cornea. OcuBall comes premade with carbon/mild steel particles inserted on the surface of the eye to provide a realistic, safe and inexpensive clinical scenario for the practice of foreign body removal. Over time, the metal pieces can rust and form a typical rust ring, just as they do in the human eye.

Made of a biocompatible polymer-based material, OcuBall is less expensive than typically sourced animal models and it eliminates concerns of cross-contamination and biological waste. OcuBall can be stored in saline for several weeks without spoilage and has no odor.

“OcuBall feels like a human eye and simulates a realistic response to embedded foreign bodies, similar to those found in clinical environments,” said OcuBlink Chief Executive Officer Hendrik Walther, PhD, MSc, BSc Optom. “We are thrilled to share the development of a model that performs like a real human eye, giving students the opportunity to gain confidence in a situation they are likely to encounter in real life.”

OcuBlink began as an initiative of the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) and now operates as an affiliate, utilizing CORE’s staffing, counsel and laboratories. In the fall of 2018, OcuBlink was accepted into Velocity, Canada’s most productive startup incubator. Last year, OcuBlink, Inc., announced its development of a life-like in-vitro eye model that reduces  dependence on animal testing to understand the science of the eye.

For more information, visit OcuBlink.com.

Download Image

 

# # #

About OcuBlink Inc.

OcuBlink develops sophisticated in vitro eye models for ophthalmic companies to accelerate research and development of products for the eye. These include devices for studying anterior and posterior eye disease and contact lens offerings, and its platforms have already been the subject of six conference abstracts and seven papers highlighting the technology. OcuBlink is affiliated with the Centre for Ocular Research and Education (CORE), based at the School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. For more information, visit OcuBlink.com.

 

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA
McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.434.2150

Contact Lens Update Issue 48 Focuses on Solution Induced Corneal Staining (SICS), Provides Free ECP Reference Download

SICS has been discussed in the literature for nearly 20 years, but are we any closer to understanding the mechanisms by which it occurs and its clinical significance?

WATERLOO, Ontario,  July 24, 2019—The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has published the latest edition of Contact Lens Update, available for free at ContactLensUpdate.com. Issue 48 focuses on exploring solution induced corneal staining (SICS).

Eric Papas, PhD, BSc, Dip CL, FAAO, provides a fascinating perspective of the journey the optometric profession has taken in order to better understand the phenomenon of transitory punctate corneal staining associated with reusable contact lens wear. Is it the lens material, the preservative in the care solution, or perhaps another agent? Read his editorial to find out more.

Over the past few years, a better understanding has been reached of what is happening at the cellular level when this type of staining occurs, and has provided suggestions both for the mechanism by which this occurs and the agents that may be responsible. Novel in vitro experimentation by Tahmina Khan, PhD, contributes  recent evidence in this area, highlighted in a  poster. In this issue, David McCanna, PhD, research assistant professor at CORE, shares a review of Khan’s manuscript.

Ultimately, for the eye care practitioner, what are the key facts to remember? A free-to-download reference tool delivers a two-minute summary of the evolution of our understanding of SICS, along with addressing what ECPs should consider when it occurs in patients.

# # #

Published six times per year, Contact Lens Update provides a global platform for unbiased clinical insights based in current research. Since 2011, each issue has provided dependable and up-to-date ocular health information for more than 60,000 leading eye care professionals.

In addition to a complete archive of back issues, ContactLensUpdate.com offers a resource library that provides no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images and video. It also houses complimentary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Industry professionals can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues.

The publication receives support from the educational arms of Alcon and Johnson & Johnson Vision.

# # #

 

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE

aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

 

 

CORE Director Tops Expertscape Global Contact Lens List

Multiple CORE Staff Achieve High Rankings; University of Waterloo Also Recognized

WATERLOO, ONTARIO, July 18, 2019—Expertscape has recognized multiple scientists and researchers at the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) as among the world’s most respected contact lens authorities.  Lyndon Jones, PhD, DSc, FCOptom, FAAO, director of CORE, was ranked as the number one global expert. The University of Waterloo placed second among institutions.

The biomedical-focused website objectively ranks people and institutions by their expertise in more than 27,000 topics, based on searches of PubMed-logged articles spanning the past decade. Expertscape allows health care professionals and consumers to find the best institutions, the leading experts, and the latest publications about a range of medical subjects. The entire contact lens ranking can be accessed at http://expertscape.com/ex/contact+lenses

“I’m humbled to be recognized alongside so many peers from around the world who are constantly adding to the growing and fascinating body of knowledge surrounding various contact lens-related topics,” said Dr. Jones. “They are close collaborators, incredibly talented professionals and personal friends in many cases. Day in and day out at CORE, I’m privileged to partner with the most dedicated and brilliant leaders in the field. It’s our life’s work and such an honor to be recognized for the contributions our team has made—and there’s so much more ahead.”

Four current CORE team members are ranked among the top 60 contact lens experts:

  • #1 Lyndon Jones, PhD, DSc, FCOptom, FAAO, CORE director, professor
  • #23 Desmond Fonn, MOptom, FAAO distinguished professor emeritus and founding director
  • #48 Doerte Luensmann, PhD, Dipl Ing (AO), FAAO, senior clinical scientist
  • #58 Chau-Minh Phan, MSc, PhD, postdoctoral fellow

Two faculty members at the School of Optometry & Vision Science at the University of Waterloo are also among the top 60:

  • #25 Luigina Sorbara, OD, MSc, FAAO, professor
  • #45 Trefford Simpson, MSc, PhD, DipOptom, professor

In addition, the list includes four former CORE staff members who have transitioned to roles across the ophthalmic spectrum, including research and development roles with global manufacturers, consultancies and academic centers.

“Seeing the prominence of both current and former colleagues makes us feel proud of the wonderful people who have contributed to CORE’s legacy of research, and illustrates the remarkable impact of our centre over the last three decades,” said Dr. Jones.

CORE also is represented on Expertscape’s contact lens solutions global experts’ list with four current and former staff members included in the top 20. Dr. Jones is ranked number two.

CORE has been involved in some of the most meaningful advancements in the history of contact lenses, including the evolution of silicone hydrogel lenses and extended wear, the development of the daily disposable lens modality, and understanding dropout and dissatisfaction with lens wear. Many of the contact lens and dry eye products currently on the market have undergone preliminary testing at CORE prior to their regulatory approval. The organization is also at the forefront of evaluating myopia management contact lenses, in addition to other medical device and pharmacological-based myopia treatments.

# # #

 

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE

aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815