CORE News

CORE Names Its “Top 10 of 2022” Scientific Papers

Topics Span Drug Delivery, Dry Eye, Microbiology, Myopia Control, MGD and More

WATERLOO, Ontario, January 16, 2023—Ahead of the first global eye care conference of the year, the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has announced its “Top 10 of 2022” publications list, designating works of significant value to clinicians, researchers, educators, and manufacturers. The papers were selected from 26 peer-reviewed manuscripts covering clinical studies, laboratory studies, and reviews developed by the organization over the past 12 months. “The entire CORE team, our collaborators, and sponsors continue to advance multiple dimensions of ocular science at a record pace, helping peers in the optometry and ophthalmology communities provide the best possible patient care,” says CORE Director Lyndon Jones, PhD, DSc, FCOptom, FAAO. “The sheer volume of these high-caliber studies can be overwhelming at times. That’s why we have selected 10 publications that represent essential knowledge for today’s eye care professionals.” Papers making the “Top 10” for 2022 (in the order in which they were published) include:
  1. Effect of a Novel Omega-3 and Omega-6 Fatty Acid Supplement on Dry Eye Disease: A 3-month Randomized Controlled Trial. Optom Vis Sci 2022; 99;1: 67-75. Ng A, et al.
Fatty acid supplementation has been discussed as a potential means to help patients with a variety of disorders due to their reported anti-inflammatory effects. Supplementation of patients with omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids has thus been advocated for patients who have dry eye due to recognition of the inflammatory processes involved with that disease, however whether this has an impact on the signs and symptoms of dry eye has not been conclusively demonstrated. In this study, CORE’s expertise in conducting clinical trials was leveraged to be able to demonstrate that supplementation with a novel combination of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids is able to significantly improve symptoms in severely symptomatic dry eye patients compared to placebo controls. Importantly, it also demonstrated that it required three months of this supplementation to start to take effect. This information will be useful to clinicians looking for additional means to help their symptomatic dry eye patients. https://doi.org/10.1097/opx.0000000000001826
  1. Testing drug release from medicated contact lenses: The missing link to predict in vivo performance. J Control Release 2022; 343 672-702. Pereira-da-Mota A, et al.
The concept of using contact lenses (CL) as drug delivery devices has been proposed for over five decades. CL offer a wide variety of advantages over drop-use for delivering drugs to the eye, as drops rapidly drain from the ocular surface and patient compliance remains poor. However, this concept remains difficult due to numerous scientific, technological, and regulatory challenges. One main difficulty is the setting of release rate specifications for each drug, since at present there are no standardized in vitro release models that can appropriately predict the performance of drug-eluting CL once placed onto the eye. This review looked at methods to predict in eye performance from lab-based models and what factors are important to develop better models and avoid animal studies. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jconrel.2022.02.014
  1. Long-term Effect of Dual-focus Contact Lenses on Myopia Progression in Children: A 6-year Multicenter Clinical Trial. Optom Vis Sci 2022; 99;3: 204-212. Chamberlain P, et al.
CORE was the largest clinical site in this international six-year study evaluating the effect of CooperVision MiSight 1 day lenses on myopia progression. The initial three-years of the study followed a conventional randomized clinical trial model with a control group (wearing Proclear 1 day) matched to a group wearing the lenses under investigation (MiSight 1 day). At the three-year mark all participants were invited to continue in the study for an additional three years, all wearing MiSight 1 day. This paper outlines the results from the six-year data. Participants who initially wore the control lens showed a slowing of their myopia progression after wearing MiSight 1 day for three years (compared to myopia progression in the first three years). For participants who wore MiSight 1 day lenses throughout the six years, the slowing of myopia progression observed in the initial three years continued in the subsequent three years. https://doi.org/10.1097/opx.0000000000001873
  1. Exploring the factors which impact overall satisfaction with single vision contact lenses. Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2022; 45;5: Guthrie S, et al.
Subjective ratings of comfort and vision are two of the most impactful measures of contact lens success. However, this work shows that dissatisfaction with ease of handling for application can be enough to lower satisfaction in all areas. In addition, a patient’s habitual lens-wearing experience is an important influencer on their perceptions. Consequently, practitioners should not underestimate the effect of a negative lens-handling experience on overall lens-wearing success. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clae.2022.101579
  1. The impact of contact lenses on meibomian gland morphology. Ocul Surf 2022; 24 148-155. Osae, E.A., et al.
Despite years of experience with contact lenses, controversy remains as to whether contact lenses adversely impact the meibomian glands (MG). This review summarized the present body of evidence, suggesting that contact lens wear is associated with alterations in MG morphology and qualitative changes in MG secretion. Key factors such as duration of contact lens wear, contact lens type, edge design, and material modulus are discussed in relation to the extent of MG morphological changes, the quality of MG secretion and other ocular surface parameters. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jtos.2022.04.001
  1. Antiviral Activity of Contemporary Contact Lens Care Solutions against Two Human Seasonal Coronavirus Strains. Pathogens 2022; 11;4: 472. Lourenco Nogueira C, et al.
In the early phases of the COVID-19 pandemic, the routes of infection that the virus could take to infect humans was under debate, with a theoretical concern of transmission through the eye. Ocular devices, including contact lenses, thus came under scrutiny as potential vectors for the virus and the effectiveness of virus removal when they were cleaned and disinfected was put into question. This paper investigated the antiviral activity of various contact lens disinfecting solutions against two seasonal coronaviruses in the same family as SARS-CoV-19. It found that oxidative solutions based on hydrogen peroxide or povidone iodine were effective against the viruses, while multipurpose solutions had little to no antiviral activity. A follow up study however demonstrated that inclusion of a rub and rise step effectively removed the vast majority of the viruses, suggesting that even multipurpose solutions are effective against viral contamination if used as directed. https://doi.org/10.3390/pathogens11040472
  1. The impact of a rub and rinse regimen on removal of human coronaviruses from contemporary contact lens materials. Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2022; 45;6: 101719. Lourenco Nogueira C, et al.
This study assessed the impact of a rub and rinse step to remove two coronavirus strains from a wide variety of soft and rigid contact lens (CL) materials using several CL disinfection solutions. The results showed that human coronavirus contamination can be easily removed from CL surfaces. Although CL care products based on oxidative systems (hydrogen peroxide and povidone-iodine) efficiently removed virus contamination from all CL surfaces without the need for a rub and rinse step, a full regimen including rub and rinse steps is crucial when using CL care products based on non-oxidative systems. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clae.2022.101719
  1. Short-term tolerability of commercial eyelid cleansers: A randomised crossover study. Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2022; 45;6: Craig J, et al.
Growing evidence has shown that lid infestation with the ocular mite Demodex is involved in the development of dry eye disease, meibomian gland dysfunction, chalazion and contact lens dropout. This study looked at the short-term tolerability of five commercially available anti-demodectic eyelid cleansers in 30 healthy non-contact lens wearers. The results highlighted varying levels of comfort and satisfaction with the different treatments, with some resulting in tear film instability, conjunctival hyperaemia and ocular surface staining on application. Awareness of these possible adverse effects will help clinicians set realistic patient expectations and encourage better compliance in their use of lid hygiene therapies for the treatment of Demodex blepharitis. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clae.2022.101733
  1. Magnitude of astigmatism – A comparison between eyes. Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2022; 45;5: 101510. Luensmann D, et al.
Astigmatism is a refractive error that typically sits more on the sideline of attention even though it is the most common refractive error, being rivaled by myopia only in certain ethnicities. A large cohort of 101,973 clinic patients was included in this retrospective chart review to determine the symmetry of astigmatism between eyes. In this cohort 87.2% of patients exhibited some level of astigmatism in at least one eye. Taking the astigmatic patients alone, it became apparent that one in four exhibited astigmatism of at least −0.75DC in one eye only, while the other eye required a lower correction. The power symmetry was high between eyes for low astigmatic corrections; for patients who had −1.00DC in the right eye, 80.8% of them had a similar prescription (± 0.50DC) in the left eye. However, symmetry was reduced with higher astigmatism; for patients with astigmatism of −4.00DC in the right eye, only 40.6% exhibited a similar level (± 0.50DC) of astigmatism in the other eye. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.clae.2021.101510
  1. Temporal Change in Pro-Inflammatory Cytokine Expression from Immortalized Human Corneal Epithelial Cells Exposed to Hyperosmotic Stress. Curr Eye Res 2022; 47;11: 1488-1495. Nagaarudkumaran N, et al.
Hyperosmolarity, or an increase in concentrations of salts and other dissolved particles in a solution, has been identified as a key contributor to the development of dry eye disease. The mechanisms through which an increase in osmolarity affects cells on the ocular surface is however still under investigation. Leveraging CORE’s expertise in cell culture, this study investigated the impact of hyperosmolar stress on corneal epithelial cells to produce biomarkers indicate inflammation as well as their metabolic activity. It found that exposure to hyperosmolar environments caused decreased cell metabolism within six hours, and provided insight into the types of changes in the measured inflammatory biomarkers at this point as well. This will provide valuable insight into the timing of when cells should be assessed for effects of hyperosmolarity as well as what inflammatory biomarkers to target for new therapies. https://doi.org/10.1080/02713683.2022.2125531 CORE offers a searchable database of its more than 2,600 peer-reviewed papers, professional articles, continuing education presentations, and scientific presentations dating back to the early 1980s. That resource is available at https://core.uwaterloo.ca/publications/. ### About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.   MEDIA CONTACTS Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, FAAO McDougall Communications for CORE aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.434.2150

CORE Publishes Guidance to Increase Multifocal Contact Lens Fitting Success, Visual Performance, and Patient Satisfaction

Issue 69 of Contact Lens Update Now Available

WATERLOO, ONTARIO, January 4, 2023—Aiming to further accelerate the growth of multifocal contact lens prescribing, the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has published guidance from three experts to help eye care professionals embrace the trend.

Issue 69 of Contact Lens Update is dedicated to evidence-based perspectives on multifocal fitting, visual performance, and patient satisfaction. It also includes a new patient-facing communication tool for in office and online use by practices. The latest edition and all past issues are available for free at ContactLensUpdate.com.

“A deeper understanding of multifocal contact lens advancements improves confidence among eye care professionals. In turn, that allows them to deliver better care for their presbyopic patients,” said CORE Head of Clinical Research Jill Woods. “This issue of Contact Lens Update demonstrates that with the right approach, consistent success is achievable.”

Marc Schulze, CORE Senior Clinical Scientist, authors the opening editorial. He shares clinical pearls that will help practitioners maximize their fitting success, such as using online tools and the appropriate fitting guides for specific lenses.

The feature article from Jennifer Fogt, Associate Clinical Professor at the Ohio State University College of Optometry, discusses the results of her study examining a comparison of the visual performance between multifocal contact lenses and progressive addition spectacles. The study found that multifocal contact lenses provide functional vision performance equal to progressive addition spectacle wear.

Sarah Guthrie, CORE Senior Research Scientist, shares insights from her poster first presented at the American Academy of Optometry annual meeting. This study explored the correlation between vision and satisfaction with multifocal contact lenses, linking that to the desire to continue wear.

Included in this issue is a CORE-produced patient facing handout that clearly and succinctly presents the benefits of multifocal contact lenses. This no cost resource can be used in the exam lane, for patient follow-up communications, as well as on practice websites and social media accounts.

Published six times per year, Contact Lens Update provides a global platform for unbiased clinical insights based in current research. Since 2011, each issue has provided dependable and up-to-date ocular health information for more than 60,000 leading eye care professionals.

In addition to a complete archive of back issues, ContactLensUpdate.com offers a resource library that provides no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images and video. It also houses complimentary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Industry professionals can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues.

The publication receives support from the educational arms of AlconCooperVision, and Johnson & Johnson Vision.

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About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, FAAO
McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

The Artificial Tears Issue: New Contact Lens Update Now Available

WATERLOO, Ontario, Nov 21, 2022—The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has published Issue 68 of Contact Lens Update, which focuses on the most recent evidence and best practices in the use of artificial tears. The latest edition and all past issues are available for free at ContactLensUpdate.com.

“When it comes to artificial tears, practitioners have a plethora of options to choose from,” said CORE Director Lyndon Jones. “This issue of Contact Lens Update focuses on equipping practitioners with information to help them best select patient-specific options.”

Andrew Pucker

Andrew Pucker, senior director of Clinical Development at Lexitas, whose research expertise includes dry eye disease, contact lenses, and myopia, provides the opening editorial. He explores how OTC lubricating eye drop formulations may address common ocular conditions including dry eye disease, contact lens discomfort and digital eye strain.

Paul Murphy

The feature article from Paul Murphy, professor at the School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of Waterloo, highlights the results of a study examining the flow characteristics of commercially available artificial tears. This provides insight into how rheology affects the efficacy of lubricating drops.

Alison Ng

Alison Ng, clinical scientist at the Centre for Ocular Research & Education, shares her poster presented at the American Optometric Association’s 2022 Annual Meeting. This study examined the symptomatic relief and kinetic tear film stability of I-DROP MGD eye drops when compared to a control over one-week of wear.

Juan Ding

Juan Ding, director of the Optometry service at the University of Massachusetts Department of Ophthalmology, shares a comprehensive fact sheet outlining artificial tear ingredients. This is a high value resource that practitioners can use to help select an appropriate artificial tear based on a patient’s individual needs.

Published six times per year, Contact Lens Update provides a global platform for unbiased clinical insights based in current research. Since 2011, each issue has provided dependable and up-to-date ocular health information for more than 60,000 leading eye care professionals.

In addition to a complete archive of back issues, ContactLensUpdate.com offers a resource library that provides no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images and video. It also houses complimentary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Industry professionals can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues.

The publication receives support from the educational arms of AlconCooperVision, and Johnson & Johnson Vision.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

Childhood Myopia Epidemic Explained in New Podcast

CORE Clinical Scientist & Myopia Expert Dr. Debbie Jones Describes How the Global Issue is Affecting Canadian Families—and What Can be Done About It.

WATERLOO, ONTARIO, November 15, 2022—A new podcast designed for non-medical listeners explains the reasons behind the global childhood myopia epidemic and what that means for Canadian families. Featuring Dr. Debbie Jones, a clinical scientist from the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) and internationally known myopia expert, the 22-minute discussion is part of the Don’t Lose Sight interview series from the Canadian Association of Optometrists.

The episode is available on the series website, as well as through major podcast platforms including Spotify and Amazon Music.

Dr. Jones defines myopia—also referred to as nearsightedness—and how it can worsen as a child grows. Speaking with podcast host Denise Balch from Connex Health, she describes the associated risks for more severe vision impairment later in life as a potential consequence.

While half the world’s population is projected to be myopic by 2050, the crisis is already evident in Canada. Dr. Jones notes that recent work showed a 30% prevalence among 11- to 13-year-olds in the Waterloo-Kitchener region. Remarkably, one-third of those children’s caregivers were unaware of the problem until the research project uncovered the condition.

Far from being insurmountable, preventing or delaying the onset of myopia is possible, says Dr. Jones. She recommends that group benefits administrators and wellness coordinators help their employees consider outdoor time and screen time plans for their children. She also describes a range of therapies that are available to slow myopia progression, including specialized contact lenses and eyeglasses, as well as eye drops.

Balch and Dr. Jones encourage parents to have their children’s eyes examined regularly by an optometrist, so that problems can be identified as early as possible.

Dr. Jones concentrates her clinical work in pediatric optometry and research in myopia control. Trained in the UK, she is currently a clinical professor at the School of Optometry and Vision Science at the University of Waterloo, where she has been a faculty member for more than two decades. She was formerly in private practice and has published articles in optometric journals and regularly presents at optometric conferences worldwide. Dr. Jones is a Fellow of the British College of Optometrists, the British Contact Lens Association and of the American Academy of Optometry.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

 

 

Following Academy Success, CORE Knowledge 3.0 Available for Online Play and Customization

Latest Version of Ultimate Eye Science Game Unlocks New Questions & Features

WATERLOO, ONTARIO, November 7, 2022—After receiving widespread attention at the 2022 American Academy of Optometry annual meeting, CORE Knowledge 3.0, the Ultimate Eye Science Game, is now available for worldwide play at COREKnowledgeGame.org.

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has also announced that it has begun licensing versions of the popular game for use by manufacturers, educational institutions, and ocular associations. These unique versions enable customized question sets, exclusive branding, and other unique elements.

CORE partnered with the Academy to prominently feature the digital competition in the organization’s exhibit hall booth, complete with four game stations and leaderboards. Over the course of three days in San Diego, hundreds of ocular researchers, educators, clinicians, students, and executives competed for CORE Knowledge’s highest scores.

The grand prize—free registration to the 2023 Academy meeting in New Orleans—was awarded to Jack Phu, BOptom, BSc, MPH, PhD, FAAO, OGS Ezell Fellow, Diplomate, a lead clinician at UNSW Sydney. Second prize, upgraded accommodations at Academy 2023, was scooped up by Monica Nguyen, a student of optometry at UC Berkeley. Henrietta Wang, BOptom, BSc FAAO, senior staff optometrist at UNSW Sydney, won a featured excursion to be redeemed during Academy next fall. Prizes were also given to the top daily scorers.

The upgraded game features approximately 800 rapid-fire multiple-choice questions created by CORE, the Academy, and members of the International Association of Contact Lens Educators (IACLE). Content covers a wide variety of basic and clinical ocular research topics, primarily related to the anterior segment.

During gameplay, participants challenge each other for spots on the leaderboard’s top 10. Points are added and deducted as players race a two-minute clock. Since the game first debuted in 2018, tens of thousands of questions have been answered—with more than 6,000 attempted during Academy in San Diego.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

About the American Academy of Optometry Centennial Celebration During this year’s annual meeting, the Academy will present a “Centennial Celebration” in recognition of its past 100 years. Highlights include “Let’s Dance and Deal”, on Friday, October 28, beginning at 9 p.m. This celebratory party is an opportunity for attendees to mingle with friends, dance through the decades, and enjoy casino games. Other events include the unveiling of an exhibit honoring the legacy and leadership of past and current Fellows and a dynamic 64-foot-long timeline and video sharing the Academy’s growth and evolution through the years. All events will be at the San Diego Convention Center.

MEDIA CONTACTS: Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

Grand Prize (left) Jack Phu, BOptom, BSc, MPH, PhD, FAAO, OGS Ezell Fellow, Diplomate Lead clinician at UNSW Sydney Second prize (top, right) Monica Nguyen, a student of optometry at UC Berkeley Third Prize (bottom, right) Henrietta Wang, BOptom, BSc FAAO Senior staff optometrist at UNSW Sydney

American Academy of Optometry Annual Meeting Attendees to Compete in the World’s Ultimate Eye Science Game

In Partnership with the Centre for Ocular Research & Education, CORE Knowledge 3.0 to Debut in the Academy’s Exhibit Floor Booth

WATERLOO, ONTARIO, October 11, 2022—Many of the world’s preeminent ocular researchers, educators, clinicians, and executives will travel to San Diego later this month, taking part in the American Academy of Optometry’s centennial celebration and annual meeting. As part of the festivities, the Academy has partnered with the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) to host CORE Knowledge 3.0—the latest iteration of the world’s ultimate eye science game.

Available for game play within the Academy exhibit booth #537 during show hours, the immersive digital experience presents players with a range of rapid-fire, multiple choice questions covering a wide variety of basic and clinical ocular research topics. Points are added and deducted as participants race a two-minute clock, tapping their screens to correctly answer as many questions as possible before time runs out.

In addition to new and revised content developed by CORE, the Academy has provided a supplemental set of questions specific to the storied history of the association. Members of the International Association of Contact Lens Educators (IACLE) have also supplied new questions designed to challenge even the most confident participants.

“We are delighted to collaborate with Academy on this initiative—a fun and fitting way to look back on so many of its accomplishments over the past 100 years,” said Lyndon Jones, PhD, FCOptom, FAAO, FBCLA, director of CORE. “When CORE Knowledge 1.0 debuted at ARVO, it drew non-stop crowds, with players collectively answering nearly 15,000 questions over more than 1,100 games. With its completely refreshed design and upwards of 750 questions, we anticipate healthy competition in San Diego to become the champion.”

During the annual meeting, daily winners will receive prizes supplied by the Academy, as will the top three scorers overall during its three-day run. Live leaderboards will be prominently displayed in the Academy booth, helping fuel the competitive spirit of conference attendees from around the world.

Following the Academy annual meeting, the game will be made available for online play on laptops and mobile devices. Customized versions of CORE Knowledge are also available for license by manufacturers, educational institutions and ocular associations.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

About the American Academy of Optometry Centennial Celebration
During this year’s annual meeting, the Academy will present a “Centennial Celebration” in recognition of its past 100 years. Highlights include “Let’s Dance and Deal”, on Friday, October 28, beginning at 9 p.m. This celebratory party is an opportunity for attendees to mingle with friends, dance through the decades, and enjoy casino games. Other events include the unveiling of an exhibit honoring the legacy and leadership of past and current Fellows and a dynamic 64-foot-long timeline and video sharing the Academy’s growth and evolution through the years. All events will be at the San Diego Convention Center.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

New Contact Lens Update Focuses on Myopia: Latest Evidence and Best Practices

WATERLOO, Ontario, September 6, 2022—The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has published Issue 67 of Contact Lens Update, which focuses on the most recent evidence and best practices in the management of myopia. The new edition and all past issues are available for free at ContactLensUpdate.com.

“The prevalence of myopia, along with its associated pathology, continues to increase globally,” said CORE Head of Clinical Research Jill Woods. “This issue of Contact Lens Update presents the latest evidence that clinicians must be aware of in order to manage myopia appropriately.”

Mark Bullimore, renowned scientist and adjunct professor at the University of Houston, provides the opening editorial. He shares insights pertaining to myopia prevalence, its role in visual impairment, and options available to slow its progression. Paul Chamberlain, senior director of Research Programs at CooperVision, and Noel Brennan, research fellow at Johnson & Johnson Vision, add supporting commentary.

The feature article from Debbie Jones, clinical professor at the School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of Waterloo, highlights key findings from the longest continuous myopia control soft contact lens study involving children. Her overview demonstrates that a safe and effective myopia management treatment is readily available.

James Loughman, professor of Optometry and Vision Science at Technological University Dublin and director of the Centre for Eye Research Ireland, shares his paper presented at the Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology’s 2022 Annual Meeting. This meta-analysis generated childhood refractive centile curves for Asian and Western populations to facilitate evidence-based myopia control. Over 35,000 refraction measurements from eight large population-based studies were included.

Kate and Paul Gifford, prominent clinical scientists and co-founders of Myopia Profile, share a valuable infographic on myopia management. It’s a resource to which practitioners can easily refer when communicating with parents of children who have myopia, using their Discuss, Describe, and Prescribe model.

Published six times per year, Contact Lens Update provides a global platform for unbiased clinical insights based in current research. Since 2011, each issue has provided dependable and up-to-date ocular health information for more than 60,000 leading eye care professionals.

In addition to a complete archive of back issues, ContactLensUpdate.com offers a resource library that provides no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images and video. It also houses complimentary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Industry professionals can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues.

The publication receives support from the educational arms of AlconCooperVision, and Johnson & Johnson Vision.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

CORE Scientists Develop Low-Cost 3D Bio-Printing Method for Ophthalmic Drug Delivery Research

WATERLOO, Ontario, August 22, 2022—An ingenious development from the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has unlocked a path to faster, inexpensive eye model creation for use in ophthalmic drug research. Using a commercially available masked stereolithography printer (mSLA) retrofitted with humidity and temperature controls, plus a new gelatin-based ink formulation, a team of scientists 3D bio-printed an in vitro eye model in under three hours.

The resulting “eye” included aqueous, vitreous, and blood chambers, a blood outlet/inlet, aqueous and vitreous outlets, and a 500μm-thick cornea—absent any artificial support structures. Phosphate-buffered saline was used as an aqueous and vitreous humor mimic in the corresponding drug delivery study, which measured contact lens-delivered dye transfer in each chamber and channel.

A summary of the novel methodology, Developing a Novel In Vitro Eye Model Using 3D Bioprinting for Drug Delivery Studies (Phan C, Wulff D, Garg P, Jones L), is now published in Investigative Ophthalmology & Visual Science, an ARVO journal.

“3D bio-printing is still in its nascent stages because it’s slow, not scalable for large-scale projects, and extremely expensive. This severely limits its use for high-throughput applications in many academic and research settings,” said Chau-Minh Phan, research assistant professor at CORE. “Our work shows the promise of an alternative approach, with much faster layer-based printing at a significantly lower cost. We believe this is a starting point for developing enhanced 3D eye models to test drug release kinetics of various devices and formulations.”

The team’s future work will focus on adding diffusion barriers to better simulate drug diffusion through ocular tissues, experimenting with co-polymer inks to extend each model’s lifespan, and fine-tuning physiological dimensions.

This latest innovation follows CORE’s creation of other sophisticated eye models in recent years for ocular testing, virtual and augmented reality applications validation, and clinical education. Its OcuBlink affiliate operates autonomously, while using CORE staffing, counsel, and laboratories.

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About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

 

MEDIA CONTACT:
Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA
McDougall Communications for CORE
mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.434.2150

Specialty Contact Lens Innovator Daddi Fadel Joins CORE

WATERLOO, Ontario, August 1, 2022—Specialty contact lens innovator Daddi Fadel, DOptom, FSLS, FBCLA, FAAO, FIACLE, will join the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) in September 2022. Dr. Fadel is one of the world’s best known designers and fitters of scleral lenses for irregular cornea and orthokeratology lenses for myopia control. Her appointment as a clinical scientist will advance CORE’s rapidly growing specialty contact lens initiatives.

“For the past two decades, Daddi has built a stellar reputation as a pioneer in modern lens design. Her immense technical expertise, deep clinical experience, and enthusiasm for sharing knowledge among her peers make her an ideal match for our specialty segment work. We’re excited about what this new collaboration will create,” said Dr. Lyndon Jones, CORE’s director.

Dr. Fadel is a frequent lecturer at international symposia, a NCLE-approved course instructor, and has authored multiple peer-reviewed papers. Her books include “Scleral Lens Issues and Complications: Their Recognition, Etiology, and Management” and “Clinical Guide for Scleral Lens Success,” co-written with Dr. Melissa Barnett. She is also the editor-in-chief of the Journal of Contact Lens Research & Science.

She is the founder and head of the European School of Scleral Lenses, founder and past president of Accademia Italiana Lenti Sclerali, and co-founder and president of the Euro & Austral-Asia Scleral Lens Academy. Dr. Fadel serves on boards of the International Forum for Scleral Lens Research and of the International Congress of Scleral Contact and advisory boards for the GP Lens Institute and the International Keratoconus Academy, and holds multiple other specialty association leadership roles.

Dr. Fadel is currently in private practice in Italy. She will relocate to CORE’s facility at the University of Waterloo in Waterloo, Ontario, Canada in the coming months.

CORE’s specialty contact lens-related work spans a range of program areas, including design optimization for orthokeratology, scleral lens physiological performance, and the impact of scleral lenses on ocular surface disease and dry eye management.

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About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS:
Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA
McDougall Communications for CORE
mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.434.2150

CORE Publishes Resource on Neuropathic Ocular Pain; Says Increased Understanding Essential to Patient Care

WATERLOO, Ontario, July 6, 2022—In response to fast-emerging clinical interest about neuropathic ocular pain, the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) is taking action to create more understanding of the issue among the global eye care community.

“While most practitioners commonly treat physiological pain, which stems from structural damage or stimuli, they’re often less confident in their abilities to diagnose and address neuropathic ocular pain, which results from nerve signal deficiency or nerve damage,” said Alex Hui, OD, PhD, FAAO, head of BioSciences for CORE. “Greater awareness, understanding, and consideration of neuropathic pain as part of the diagnosis and differential diagnosis process, plus familiarity with options to help patients navigate the challenge, is essential for evolved care.”

In primary eye care settings, neuropathic corneal pain is most commonly observed in patients experiencing dry eye, having herpetic corneal infection, and following kerato-refractive or cataract surgery. While the TFOS DEWS and DEWS II reports have elevated the issue, there is still widespread misinterpretation of neuropathic pain as physiological discomfort.

As part of its efforts to educate practitioners, CORE has dedicated Issue 66 of Contact Lens Update to the issue. The bi-monthly publication is available at no charge by visiting ContactLensUpdate.com.

Anat Galor

Anat Galor, staff physician at the Miami VA and associate professor of Ophthalmology at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, University of Miami, along with recent medical school graduate, Sneh Patel, contribute the editorial. The authors provide a systematic overview of neuropathic pain and its manifestation in the eye. A comprehensive summary of the state of the art in respect to the diagnoses and treatment of ocular neuropathic pain rounds off the editorial.

Jessica Steen

Jessica Steen, assistant professor at Nova Southeastern Univiersity College of Optometry, provides the feature article that highlights a retrospective case-series assessing post-LASIK neuropathic pain. These findings demonstrate the importance of careful patient selection, assessment of risk factors and post-operative evaluation in preventing the development of neuropathic corneal pain in those who undergo LASIK.

Richard Maharaj

Prism Eye Institute’s Richard Maharaj shares his expertise in the form of a clinical insight.  A comprehensive case-report outlines the evaluation, treatment, and follow-up of a patient with mild dry-eye and post-LASIK neuropathic pain. Maharaj demonstrates how a thorough assessment, multimodal treatment algorithm, and collaboration between eye care practitioners and other health care providers, results in greatly improved quality of life in those affected by neuropathic ocular pain.

Pedram Hamrah

The conference highlight is shared by Pedram Hamrah, interim chairman of the Department of Ophthalmology and Professor of Ophthalmology at Tufts University School of Medicine. This poster demonstrates the similarity in morphological changes of the corneal nerves in symptomatic and intolerant contact lens wearers, and those with neuropathic corneal pain. The findings from this study suggest a neurosensory component to contact lens discomfort.

In addition to a complete archive of back issues, ContactLensUpdate.com offers a resource library that provides no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images and video. It also houses complimentary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Industry professionals can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues.

The publication receives support from the educational arms of AlconCooper Vision, and Johnson & Johnson Vision.

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About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815