CORE News

CORE to Present Insights, Receive Accolades at 2019 Global Contact Lens Symposium

Practitioner Lectures, Educator Meeting and IACLE Award Presentation Highlight Annual Meeting

WATERLOO, Ontario, January 22, 2019—The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) today announced a series of events in which it will participate at the 2019 Global Specialty Lens Symposium (GSLS). The annual meeting is taking place from January 24 – 27 at the Tropicana Las Vegas resort.

On Thursday, January 24, CORE’s Lyndon Jones, PhD, DSc, FCOptom, FAAO, FBCLA, and Karen Walsh, OD, BSc(Hons), MCOptom, will present “Sensitive to Silicone? Understanding and Managing Who Present with an Adverse Reaction” from 3 – 4 p.m. PT.

Dr. Jones will take to the podium again on Friday, January 25, from 10:30 – 11:30 a.m. PT, with a review talk on “Hydrogen Peroxide Care Systems: Should it Be the First Choice?” He will be joined by Christopher Lievens, OD, MS, chief of Internal Clinics and professor at Southern College of Optometry.

Immediately preceding GSLS, Dr. Jones will share four-year study data regarding the CooperVision MiSight® 1-day soft contact lens for myopia management at the company’s annual educators meeting. This invitation-only gathering is attended by contact lens professors from nearly two dozen schools and colleges of optometry across North America. Physiological changes among 100 myopic children from Canada, Singapore, England, and Portugal were evaluated during the landmark study’s fourth year, with CORE serving as the lead clinical research organization.

He will also formally receive the 2018 International Association of Contact Lens Educators (IACLE) Americas Contact Lens Educator of the Year Award while in Las Vegas.

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 About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

 

MEDIA CONTACT

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE

aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

 

Review Study Draws Attention to Inadequate Hand Hygiene Among Contact Lens Wearers, Suggests Strategies to Avoid Infection

Up to 50% of Patients May Disregard or Neglect Handwashing; CORE Paper Shows Potential in Education & Innovative Design to Combat Poor Habits

WATERLOO, Ontario, January 19, 2019—Improper hand hygiene can have serious consequences for contact lens wearers, according to a recent paper from the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE). The report, published in Contact Lens and Anterior Eye, draws attention to poor hygiene associated with contact lens wear, and in particular how hand washing habits could affect the development of contact lens related microbial keratitis and corneal inflammatory events.

“While proof that hand washing reduces infection dates back to the mid-1800s, we’re still facing significant issues in having consumers change their hygiene behaviors,” said Lyndon Jones, PhD, DSc, FCOptom, FAAO, FBCLA, the paper’s co-author and director of CORE. “In compiling this review of public health literature, our hope is to make the facts and possible mitigation strategies more accessible to eye care professionals. They’re on the front lines of helping contact lens wearers understand that eye health is literally in their own hands.”

The paper notes that numerous techniques exist to help prevent microbial keratitis or corneal inflammatory events among contact lens patients, including careful and thorough hand washing with soap and water followed by hand drying with unused paper towels. While the eye care industry has made significant investments in patient education, “literature on the effects of education of proper hand washing is at best scant.”

Alternatively, the report identifies advancements in contact lens offerings as providing new hope.  These include more frequent fitting of daily disposable contact lenses, citing the reduced contamination due to removal and discarding after each wearing period. Additional innovations include a new lens package design that minimizes interaction between the finger and the lens surface, and a novel disinfecting component included in the lens blister pack solution.

The paper was co-authored by Desmond Fonn, MOptom, FAAO, distinguished professor emeritus at the University of Waterloo, School of Optometry & Vision Science.

CORE recently published a series of eye-popping photos that demonstrate the rapid growth of bacteria associated with mishandling contact lenses. They are available for use by eye care professionals at https://core.uwaterloo.ca/news/seeing-is-believing-eye-popping-photos-show-why-good-contact-lens-hygiene-is-essential/

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About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACT

Aimee J. Lewis

McDougall Communications for CORE

aimee@mcdougallpr.com or +1.585.414.9838

Seeing is Believing: Eye-Popping Photos Show Why Good Contact Lens Hygiene is Essential

Resolve to Clean Up Your Contact Lens Routine this Holiday Season, say Eye Scientists at the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

WATERLOO, ONTARIO, December 19, 2018—Caught short without your contact lens case or care solutions? Lens unexpectedly falls out? What would you do? NBA star Ron Baker, faced with just this dilemma earlier this year chose to pop his lens in his mouth to wet it and then place it back on his eye. This was seen by countless people around the world as the video clip spread online, eliciting cringes from the eye health community and shrugs from wearers who have done the same.

During the holidays, when routines are disrupted and time is at a premium, contact lens wearers may also be tempted to skip regular hygiene practices. But is it wise? Scientists from the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) at the University of Waterloo conducted an eye-popping experiment to help consumers picture the risks.

To demonstrate the rapid growth of bacteria associated with mishandling contact lenses, CORE researchers exposed new, clean contact lenses to human saliva and then placed them into petri plates for monitoring. The action of putting a contact lens in the mouth resulted in significant growth of microorganisms after only two days of incubation (Figure 1).

They then examined the effect of handling contact lenses with both clean and unwashed hands. Unwashed hands were pressed into agar (Figure 2a), and also used to handle a new contact lens (Figure 2b). Scientists then repeated the procedure after following recommended handwashing practices, touching both the agar directly, along with applying and removing a contact lens (Figures 2c and 2d). The results clearly demonstrate the impact handling has on contact lenses. Samples that had been placed in the mouth or touched with unwashed hands showed significantly higher numbers of visible bacteria. By comparison, the contact lens touched with clean hands had only a minimal bacterial load.

“Contact lenses are a safe, highly effective form of vision correction used by millions of people, but ignoring good contact lens care can have a devastating effect on eye health and vision,” says CORE senior research associate Miriam Heynen, MSc, who conducted the experiment with laboratory research assistant Vivian Chan, Bsc., after hearing a news report on poor contact lens care habits.

She continued, “Bacteria are present on surfaces all around us and this simple experiment is a graphic demonstration of how they reproduce over just a short amount of time. Taking care of your contact lenses is a must, no matter how pressed for time you are. Handle with clean, dry hands, use a case and care solution as recommended by an eye care practitioner, and always keep spare contact lenses and spectacles with you. Proper care is simple, essential for good health, and after seeing these photos, a no-brainer for anyone who appreciates their eyes.”

Contact lens wearers can more easily resolve to practice better hygiene during the holiday season and the New Year, thanks to a printable, easy-to-read tip sheet available from CORE which covers good hand hygiene along with other reminders on safe contact lens wear.

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About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE

aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

Canadian Eye Care Practices Encouraged to Participate in CORE-Led Clinical Studies

Organization Seeks More Sites to Meet Increased Demand for Contact Lens and Dry Eye Disease Research

WATERLOO, Ont., December 10, 2018—Anticipating continued growth in 2019, the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) is seeking additional Canadian eye care practices to serve as clinical study sites. Eligible practices need to fit high volumes of contact lenses and/or have an interest in treating dry eye disease.

CORE has successfully collaborated with several Canadian practices in recent months, including Eyes on Sheppard Optometric Clinic in Toronto, Mission Eye Care in Calgary and Clinique D’Optometrie Bélanger in Montreal.

CORE Clinical Scientist Dr. Alison Ng and Dr. Andrea Lasby from Mission Eye Care in Calgary, Alberta, following a retrospective chart review collaboration in Fall 2018.

“We’re fortunate to have phenomenal eye care practices located across Canada, and CORE has worked with several in recent years on studies that have worldwide impact,” said CORE Director Lyndon Jones, PhD, DSc, FCOptom, FAAO, FBCLA. “Partnering with innovative sponsors and through our independent initiatives, CORE is helping advance ocular science and improve the vision of millions. We’re eager to collaborate with even more Canadian practices as the breadth and volume of our research expands.”

Studies may include new contact lens materials, solutions and designs, plus new dry eye management therapies incorporating pharmaceuticals, lubricants and devices. In addition to patient recruitment, some practices may be ideal for retrospective chart reviews and data collection. Practices do not require previous clinical trials experience.

For more information, contact CORE at (519) 888-4742 or CORE@uwaterloo.ca.

 

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE

aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

CORE Predicts Future of Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lenses at Academy ‘18

“Rapid Fire” CE Session Anticipated to Draw Significant Interest; Researchers also Presenting Six Posters in San Antonio

SAN ANTONIO, November 7, 2018—With silicone hydrogel contact lenses moving past the two-decade mark, is there still ground to cover for this game-changing material? The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE), which has played key roles in multiple pivotal contact lens advancements, believes the future will be defined by new applications, designs, manufacturing platforms, and wearer benefitsand is sharing those predictions at the 2018 American Academy of Optometry Annual Meeting.

Its continuing education session, Celebrating 20 Years of Silicone Hydrogels: the Past, Present and Future, is expected to attract substantial interest across the profession. Using the analogy of a child growing from infancy to its college years, four CORE scientists will cover distinct time periods in the evolution of silicone hydrogel lenses, and share how practitioners’ understanding of how to optimize their use has changed over time. The rapid fire session is capped by an informed look to the future, addressing topics that include:

  • Improvements for additional comfort gains,
  • Reductions in corneal inflammatory events and microbial keratitis,
  • Capabilities to cost-effectively manufacture select designs at scale,
  • Myopia control designs and the advent of smart contact lenses,
  • Challenges of drug eluting contact lenses,
  • Biosensing technologies, and their ocular and systemic applications,
  • And the exploration of unique optical designs.

Lyndon Jones, PhD, DSc, FCOptom, FAAO, FBCLA, director of CORE, is making these forecasts on Thursday, November 8, from 3 – 4 pm CST in Room 217 A-B. He will be joined by colleagues Jill Woods, BSc (Hons), MCOptom, FAAO, Karen Walsh, BSc (Hons), MCOptom, PGDip, and Doerte Luensmann, PhD, Dipl. Ing. (AO), FAAO.

“By understanding how silicone hydrogel materials have changed over time and what the future holds, eye care professionals will be able to deliver more optimal experiences for their practices and patients,” said Dr. Jones. “This includes complex interactions with the ocular surface and tear film, leading to better recommendations for material, design and modality.”

In addition to its CE session, CORE is presenting six posters at Academy ‘18:

  • Novel In-Vitro Method to Study Bacterial Interaction with Contact Lenses on Friday, November 9 from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. (Board #140).
  • Validation of Multifocal Soft Lens Power Calculator in OptiExpert: Application for clariti 1-Day Multifocal Lens Fitting on Friday, November 9 from 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. (Board #158).
  • Method Optimization to Quantify Four Neuropeptides in the Human Tear Film on Friday, November 9 from 1 – 3 p.m. (Board #61).
  • Physical Dimension and Optical Assessment of Currently Marketed Silicone Hydrogel Contact Lenses after Exposure to Cosmetics on Friday, November 9 from 1 – 3 p.m. (Board #157).
  • Professional Collaboration for Patient-Centered Eye Care on Thursday, November 8 and Friday, November 9 (Board #20)
  • Centre for Ocular Research & Education: Mission and Capabilities Overview on Thursday, November 8 and Friday, November 9 (Board #21)

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE

aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

Lyndon Jones, Jennifer Craig & Craig Woods Tapped to Present Dry Eye Detection Live at Scottish Optical Conference

Event Expected to Draw Several Hundred Eye Care Professionals to Glasgow

GLASGOW, October 24, 2018—When optometrists, contact lens opticians and ophthalmologists gather at next month’s Scottish Optical Conference (soc.scot) in Glasgow, they’ll have the opportunity to participate in one of the profession’s most acclaimed interactive training sessions.

Dry Eye Detection Live translates TFOS DEWS II diagnostic and treatment papers into a live demonstration with on-stage instrument instruction. The program has won rave reviews worldwide, including at recent American Optometric Association, American Academy of Optometry and British Contact Lens Association meetings. It is presented by internationally-renowned dry eye experts Lyndon Jones, PhD, DSc, FCOptom, FAAO, FBCLA, director of CORE, Jennifer Craig, BSc (Hons), MSc, PhD, MCOptom, FAAO, FBCLA, FCCLSA, from New Zealand and Craig Woods, PhD, MCOptom, DipCL, FAAO, FACO, FBCLA, from Australia.

“This not-to-be-missed session will be one of the highlights at the 2018 SOC,” said Caroline Christie, the conference organizer. “The interest in advances in dry eye diagnoses and treatment has been heightened by the TFOS DEWS II report, and this event provides an opportunity for every eye care practitioner to witness practice-changing strategies for managing dry eye. We’re privileged to have three prominent leaders in the field share their academic and clinical knowledge first hand from the stage, as well as through more personal conversations that our unique conference setting makes possible.”

The 2018 Scottish Optical Conference will be held on Sunday, November 25 at the Glasgow Radisson Blu Hotel. For more information and registration details, please visit soc.scot.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA

McDougall Communications for CORE

aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

https://core.uwaterloo.ca/news/lyndon-jones-jennifer-craig-craig-woods-tapped-to-present-dry-eye-detection-live-at-scottish-optical-conference/

OcuBlink, Inc. Accepted into Velocity, Canada’s Most Productive Startup Incubator

WATERLOO, Ontario, October 18, 2018—OcuBlink, Inc., which is developing sophisticated in vitro eye models for ophthalmic testing, has been accepted into Velocity, widely acknowledged as Canada’s most productive startup incubator.

The move will allow OcuBlink access to increased laboratory space, advanced equipment for device prototyping, and an inclusive, interdisciplinary environment designed to stimulate innovation, entrepreneurial thinking and successful commercialization. It also provides a gateway to additional professional expertise and a network of emerging and developed Velocity-fueled businesses.

OcuBlink began as an initiative of the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) and now operates as an affiliate, utilizing CORE’s staffing, counsel and laboratories. It intends to co-locate staff at CORE offices in Waterloo as well as the Velocity Garage complex in nearby Kitchener, Ontario.

“Our acceptance into the Velocity Garage will further accelerate our development path, benefitting fellow researchers and ophthalmic industry organizations who have shown interest in the technology,” said OcuBlink Chief Executive Officer Hendrik Walther, PhD, MSc, BSc Optom. “We expect to unveil a fully functioning prototype in early 2019, taking us to the next stage of testing and validation.”

Traditional ocular testing uses a vial or a test tube for early stage research, with later pre-clinical studies performed using an animal model. However, vials and test tubes do not remotely resemble the complex structure of the eye, leading to variable outcomes, and increasing regulation and public opinion is limiting animal experimentation. Incorporating OcuBlink to test concepts and prototypes at an earlier stage will minimize costs, reduce animal experimentation, and create deeper understanding of the underlying science of how new and existing products interact with the eye.

For more information, visit OcuBlink.com.

# # #

About OcuBlink Inc.

OcuBlink develops sophisticated in vitro eye models for ophthalmic companies to accelerate research and development of products for the eye. These include devices for studying anterior and posterior eye disease and contact lens offerings, and its platforms have already been the subject of six conference abstracts and seven papers highlighting the technology. Ocublink is affiliated with the Centre for Ocular Research and Education (CORE), based at the School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. For more information, visit OcuBlink.com.

 

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS:

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA

McDougall Communications for CORE

aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.434.2150

https://core.uwaterloo.ca/news/ocublink-inc-accepted-into-velocity-canadas-most-productive-startup-incubator/

PRESS RELEASE – Dr William Ngo OD PhD FAAO appointed Head of Biosciences

WATERLOO, Ontario, October 2, 2018— It gives me great pleasure to announce the appointment of Dr William Ngo as Head of Biosciences at the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE), in the School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Canada.

Dr Ngo received his Doctor of Optometry degree from Waterloo in 2011. He undertook his PhD (entitled “Contemporary Diagnosis and Management of Dry Eye”) under the direction of Professor Lyndon Jones and Dr Sruthi Srinivasan at the University of Waterloo, graduating in October 2016. During this time he was a two-times American Academy of Optometry Foundation “Ezell Fellow” and was awarded the “Desmond Fonn Contact Lens Research” award. He was also awarded multiple grants from the Canadian Optometric Education Trust Fund.

He is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow (PDF) at the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry, under the supervision of Professor Jason Nichols.  Dr Ngo is a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry. His research interests include the clinical diagnosis and management of dry eye disease, contact lens discomfort, tear film biology and chemistry, and the mechanisms of oxidative stress in meibomian gland disease. He has authored over 40 scientific papers, posters, abstracts and presentations in these areas.

Dr Ngo will join CORE upon completion of his PDF, in early 2019.

Lyndon Jones PhD DSc FCAHS FCOptom DipCLP DipOrth FAAO (DipCL) FIACLE FBCLA
University Research Chair
Professor, School of Optometry and Vision Science
Director, Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

PRESS RELEASE – OcuBlink, Inc. Wins Seed Funding from Two Prominent Business Accelerators

CORE-Affiliated Start-Up Developing Sophisticated In Vitro Eye Models for Accelerated Ophthalmic R&D

WATERLOO, Ontario, August 9, 2018—OcuBlink, Inc., which is developing sophisticated in vitro eye models for ophthalmic testing, has received funding from two prominent business accelerators. The company will use the funds and associated entrepreneurial coaching to scale its business, focused on assisting research centers, pharmaceutical and medical device companies validate ocular products more rapidly and cost-effectively.

AC JumpStart, funded by FedDev Ontario, awarded OcuBlink CAD$30,000 in seed capital and CAD$10,000 of in-kind mentorship. The accelerator helps technology start-ups establish and grow their business in Southern Ontario. OcuBlink was also named one of four winners in the annual Velocity Fund $5K competition, an entrepreneurship program at the University of Waterloo and the most productive start-up incubator in Canada.

OcuBlink began as an initiative of the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) and now operates as an affiliate, utilizing CORE’s staffing, counsel and laboratories.

“We’ve been developing our novel in vitro platforms since 2014, working with industry partners and researchers to validate our technology. Now it’s time to bring our innovations to market, with the invaluable assistance of AC Jumpstart and the Velocity Fund,” said OcuBlink Chief Executive Officer Hendrik Walther, PhD, MSc, BSc Optom.

Traditional testing uses a vial or a test tube for early stage research, with later pre-clinical studies performed using an animal model. However, vials and test tubes do not remotely resemble the complex structure of the eye, leading to variable outcomes, and increasing regulation and public opinion is limiting animal experimentation. Incorporating OcuBlink to test concepts and prototypes at an earlier stage will minimize costs, reduce animal experimentation, and create deeper understanding of the underlying science of how new and existing products interact with the eye.

For more information, visit OcuBlink.com.

# # #

About OcuBlink Inc.

OcuBlink develops sophisticated in vitro eye models for ophthalmic companies to accelerate research and development of products for the eye. These include devices for studying anterior and posterior eye disease and contact lens offerings, and its platforms have already been the subject of six conference abstracts and seven papers highlighting the technology. Ocublink is affiliated with the Centre for Ocular Research and Education (CORE), based at the School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of Waterloo, Ontario, Canada. For more information, visit OcuBlink.com.

 

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

Download the press release (.pdf)

PRESS RELEASE – CORE Enhances ContactLensManagement.com Guide; Site Helps Practitioners Better Identify and Manage Contact Lens-Related Issues

Searchable database features conditions, management, photos and videos

WATERLOO, Ontario, June 13, 2018—Eye care professionals can now access a free, fully-searchable database which includes descriptions, images and videos to help identify and manage contact lens related issues. Now under the direction of the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE), with significant enhancements and new content, the Clinical Contact Lens Management Guide (ContactLensManagement.com) will serve as an indispensable resource for established and new practitioners, as well as students.

The site lists conditions in four sections: cornea, limbus, conjunctiva and lid. Each entry is also cross-referenced by contact lens, signs, symptoms and biomicroscope categories. Clicking through, each item presents a detailed description of the condition, its signs, symptoms, prevalence, differential diagnosis, and management, along with photos and videos to aid in diagnosis and resolution.

“ContactLensManagement.com is intended to be an easy-to-use, compact summary and searchable reference for contact lens practitioners, covering both common and low-grade conditions as well as more rare and serious issues,” said Lyndon Jones, director of CORE. “Early response to its redesign and substantial new content indicates the site will likely see rapid adoption and widespread use worldwide in clinical and academic settings.”

First conceived in 1993, the Clinical Contact Lens Management Guide has been edited in its many forms by renowned professionals. Now, as a fully-independent resource hosted by CORE, and supported by an independent medical education grant from Alcon®, the site includes enhancements such as a rich search feature to help practitioners easily filter conditions by their presenting signs and symptoms. New content includes instructional information on biomicroscope techniques, including unique CORE-produced, high-resolution videos designed to help optometry students, newly qualified optometrists and practitioners in developing markets.

The content will continue to be updated by CORE, with new information added over time. Later this year expect to see updated sections on Demodex along with incorporation of information from the recent DEWS II dry eye report.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

Download the press release (.pdf)