CORE News

CORE Summarizes BCLA CLEAR Guidance for Contact Lens Practitioners

New Issue of Contact Lens Update Interprets and Consolidates the 10 Global Sub-Reports into a Single, Easy-to-Use Document WATERLOO, Ontario, June 15, 2021—The latest issue of Contact Lens Update, now available for free from the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE), consolidates conclusions from the new British Contact Lens Association’s (BCLA) Contact Lens Evidence-based Academic Reports (CLEAR) initiative into an easy-to-read summary for contact lens practitioners.
Karen Walsh
“CLEAR brought together 10 committees and more than 100 authors from sixteen countries to produce 300 pages of scientific review. This covered all aspects of contact lens practice, from routine fitting through to specialty lenses, management of complications, and future technology,” said Karen Walsh, CORE’s education team leader and editor of Contact Lens Update. “Our BCLA-commissioned summary of all ten sub-reports extracts and explains the insights most relevant for clinical practice in one simple guide. This will become a frequent reference for eye care professionals wanting to implement the latest standards in contact lenses while remaining abreast of forthcoming trends and opportunities.” The CLEAR sub-report summary promotes best practice, evidence-based procedures and clinical decision making for contact lens patients. Found in the issue’s Feature Article section, each five-minute read provides an overview of key take aways by topic and a link to the comprehensive open access paper for further reading. Multiple CORE scientists authored the original reports; they joined other CORE staff and global collaborators in developing the new condensed guidance.
Manbir Nagra
CLEAR author and BCLA Certificate Programme Lead Dr. Manbir Nagra wrote the new issue’s editorial. She identifies common themes across the reports, highlights how to interpret scientific publications, examines the evidence base for several widely held beliefs, and looks to the future of contact lens practice.
Sarah Guthrie
Insights from CORE Senior Research Scientist Dr. Sarah Guthrie are shared in the Conference Highlight. Presented this week at the 2021 BCLA Clinical Conference & Exhibition, her work with multifocal soft contact lenses explores the link between comfort and vision performance, reminding eye care professionals of the importance of optimising both elements to help enhance the wearing experience. “It’s a lovely coincidence that Issue #60 of Contact Lens Update is being published during the 60th anniversary of soft contact lens pioneer Otto Wichterle creating the very first hydrogel lenses in his kitchen. The CLEAR series paints a fascinating portrait of how far we have come in the past six decades, and the breathtaking developments on the horizon,” said Dr. Walsh. Published six times per year, Contact Lens Update provides a global platform for unbiased clinical insights based in current research. Since 2011, each issue has provided dependable and up-to-date ocular health information for more than 60,000 leading eye care professionals. In addition to a complete archive of back issues, ContactLensUpdate.com offers a resource library that provides no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images and video. It also houses complimentary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Industry professionals can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues. The publication receives support from the educational arms of Alcon, CooperVision, and Johnson & Johnson Vision. # # # About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.   MEDIA CONTACTS Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

CORE Announces 2021 BCLA Virtual Clinical Conference Presentations for June 13-14

Future Contact Lens Applications, Comfort and Multifocals on Tap for Globally Streamed Event

WATERLOO, Ontario, June 3, 2021—The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) today announced its participation in the 2021 BCLA Virtual Clinical Conference, which will run from June 13-14 as a globally-available digital live stream. Even in the midst of the pandemic, CORE has continued to widely publish and present topics critical to the future of optometry and ophthalmology.

Among the conference highlights will be Dr. Lyndon Jones’ COPE-accredited session on future applications for contact lenses, culled from the BCLA’s new Contact Lens Evidence-based Academic Reports (CLEAR) series. Contact Lens Technologies of the Future (Jones L, et al.) represents one of the most comprehensive reviews of advancements that will shape the category’s future, including novel biomaterials, nanotechnology progress, unique optical designs, biosensing discoveries, antibacterial agents, plus battery miniaturization and power transfer.

“Since its initial publication only two months ago, the future technologies paper has captured the attention of our peers and from emerging entrants to the category. It has also drawn interest from mainstream news media in multiple countries, sparking dozens of stories and stimulating consumer interest in contact lenses. The opportunities for manufacturers, eye care professionals and of course the millions who will benefit from these innovations cannot be overstated,” said Jones.

Dr. Chau-Minh Phan, a research assistant professor with CORE, was among the paper’s 14 co-authors. Six other CORE scientists contributed to the broader BCLA CLEAR Reports series, serving as co-authors on a variety of papers that cover anatomy and physiology, complications, evidence-based practice, and the effect of lens materials and design.

Professor Eric Papas will chair an Alcon-sponsored session on contact lens comfort, with contributions from Professors Lyndon Jones, Jennifer Craig (New Zealand) and Greg Sawyer (USA) on the BCLA main stage, as part of the conference’s application track. They will review the complex interactions that occur between contact lens materials, ocular surface cells and the tear film, and how these interactions impact comfort and ultimately wearer retention.

Professor Jones will also be one of four BCLA-designated North American hosts acting as chairs for the second half of day one. In addition, CORE researchers Jill Woods, Doerte Luensmann, Marc Schulze, and Sarah Guthrie are each presenting narrated posters regarding a multifocal contact lens clinical study, available as part of the conference’s extensive scientific program.

BCLA anticipates that more than 1,000 United Kingdom and international contact lens professionals will attend the June 2021 conference over the course of its 30-hour live stream.

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About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA
McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.434.2150

New Contact Lens Update Focuses on Ocular Allergy

Latest Issue Provides a Comprehensive Review of the Condition and Practical Advice on Contemporary Management

WATERLOO, Ontario, April 29th, 2021—The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has published issue number 59 of its free online education magazine, Contact Lens Update. Just in time for peak allergy season in the Northern Hemisphere, this edition provides an overview of the essential aspects of diagnosing and managing this itchy, uncomfortable condition that can impact up to 40% of patients.

Drs Laura Periman, Sathi Maiti & Natasha Balani

This issue’s editorial has been written by members of the Periman Eye Institute in Seattle, Dr. Laura Periman and her two fellows Drs. Sathi Maiti and Natasha Balani. Together they give a complete review of ocular allergy, plus all-important practical advice on how best to diagnose and treat the condition, from its mildest to most severe forms.

Dr. Katherine Mastrota

A recent publication highlighted the connection between ocular allergy and dry eye disease, and Dr. Katherine Mastrota, director of optometry for the NY Hotel Trade Council Employee Benefit Funds, provides a review of that work in the feature article. Her overview offers clear guidance to help improve patient care, and illustrates the importance of accurate differential diagnosis and the need for tailored treatment across the spectrum of these two inter-related conditions. 

Dr. Shawn Moore

The theme of practical, clinical advice in this issue of Contact Lens Update continues with Canadian Optometrist, Dr. Shawn Moore’s review of an open access publication that covers all aspects of allergic conjunctivitis. From quality-of-life considerations to the need for inter-professional collaboration for complicated cases, Moore shares insights along with a simple treatment algorithm for use in practice.

Finally, the conference highlight brings a glimpse of the future with an additional, soon to be available, new option for contact lens wearers who have seasonal allergies. With the recent regulatory approval for an antihistamine-releasing contact lens being given in Japan, this novel technology has taken a step closer to becoming available for patients. Ahead of that, read about its sustained drug-release profile in work by Dr. Brian Pall and colleagues that was presented at ARVO 2020.

Published six times per year, Contact Lens Update provides a global platform for unbiased clinical insights based in current research. Since 2011, each issue has provided dependable and up-to-date ocular health information for more than 60,000 leading eye care professionals.

In addition to a complete archive of back issues, ContactLensUpdate.com offers a resource library that provides no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images and video. It also houses complimentary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Industry professionals can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues.

The publication receives support from the educational arms of Alcon, CooperVision, and Johnson & Johnson Vision.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

 

MEDIA CONTACTS
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

Contact Lenses to Advance Well Beyond Refractive Error Correction, According to New BCLA CLEAR Report

Contact Lens Technologies of the Future Paper Reviews Progress in Materials and Designs that Underpin Innovative Uses for Disease Detection & Therapy, Drug Delivery, Vision Enhancement and More

WATERLOO, Ontario, March 29, 2021—A newly-published paper represents one of the most comprehensive reviews of advancements to come in contact lenses, catapulting the commonly-used medical device to applications well beyond refractive error correction.

Contact Lens Technologies of the Future (Jones L, et al.) is now in press from Contact Lens and Anterior Eye, the peer review journal of the British Contact Lens Association (BCLA). It joins nine other papers being printed in next month’s special edition as part of the BCLA-led Contact Lens Evidence-based Academic Reports (CLEAR) series.

“There are a range of diverse technologies that are shaping the future of contact lenses, in some cases already showing their potential in late-stage development initiatives and even commercially-available products,” said Lyndon Jones, director of the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) and the paper’s lead author. “Novel biomaterials, nanotechnology progress, unique optical designs, biosensing discoveries, antibacterial agents and even battery miniaturization and power transfer are coalescing like never before. The next several years will see incredible advancements and growth for an expanded contact lens category.”

The extensively-referenced paper explores several areas in which innovations are anticipated to make an impact. The presence of biomarkers in the tear film will give rise to diagnostic contact lenses to help detect and monitor systemic and ocular diseases, including diabetes, cancer, and dry eye disease. Integrated circuit progress may give rise to in-lens intraocular pressure monitoring for glaucoma and even retinal vasculature imaging for early detection of diseases such as hypertension, stroke and diabetes.

Ocular disease treatment and management may likewise benefit from progress in fluid dynamics, materials science and microelectronics. Dehydration-resistant materials combined with electro-osmotic flow and reactive oxygen species-scavenging materials—when integrated into lenses—could offer alternative dry eye disease therapies. Liquid crystal cells could replicate the functionality of the pupil and iris arrangement, autonomously filtering incoming light to overcome physiological defects. Embedded, tunable spectral filtering has the potential to mitigate color vision deficiencies.

Drug delivering contact lenses may offer more accurate dosing versus traditional eye drops, increasing the residence time of a drug on the ocular surface with less exposure to elements such as blinking and non-productive conjunctival absorption, reducing the many known side effects of drugs. Delivery might come from in vitro uptake and release, incorporation of drug-containing nanoparticles into contact lens materials during the manufacturing process, and even molecular imprinting to imbue polymers with memory characteristics that aid dispensation. These techniques and related advancements will open up opportunities for contact lenses as theranostics, the multi-disciplinary medical field that combines therapeutics and diagnostics. Uniting sensing technology and microfabrication, theranostic lenses would release appropriate therapeutics based on continuous monitoring inputs, replacing more invasive procedures.

While “smart” lenses have become associated with on-eye head-up displays, the authors write that optical enhancements extend well beyond those manifestations. Customized optics could address aberrated eyes, with the front surface of a lens shaped to specifically reduce measured aberrations based on each person’s unique corneal shape. Embedded microelectronics might constantly monitor corneal gaze direction, controlling optical elements to address presbyopia in real time. Myopia control lenses are slowing axial growth in children, responding to one of the most pressing issues in eye health today. And optical and digital display discoveries hold the potential for assisting people who suffer from low vision—and then extend to the general population to replace or supplement traditional screens.

The paper concludes with an overview of packaging and storage case material and design developments that may offer improved hygiene and reduced wearer-induced contamination.

Joining Dr. Jones as one of this paper’s 14 authors is Chau-Minh Phan, a research assistant professor with CORE. Six other CORE scientists contributed to the BCLA CLEAR Reports series, serving as co-authors on papers regarding anatomy and physiology, complications, evidence-based practice, and the effect of lens materials and design.

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About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

CORE Offers Tips on Seeking Eyecare During the Pandemic, Provides Free Infographics for ECPs to Use with Patients

Companion Feature Article for The Conversation Answers Frequent Patient Questions; Now Reaching Millions Worldwide through Mainstream Media

WATERLOO, Ontario, March 10, 2021—As the global COVID-19 pandemic enters its second year, a new initiative from the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) is addresses questions that may keep people from seeking proper eye care.

CORE has designed two infographics that eye care professionals can incorporate into ongoing patient communications, such as through newsletters, email campaigns, website content, social media and in-office displays. Created to be quickly read and easily understood, one infographic focuses on reasons to urgently contact an eye doctor. The other reassures patients of common steps being taken to ensure safety during in-office exams. Both are available for download from COVIDeyefacts.org and may be used at no cost if the content is not altered.

In conjunction, CORE Clinical Scientists Alison Ng, PhD, BSc(Hons), MCOptom, FAAO, and Mike Yang, OD, BSc, FAAO, have authored a consumer-facing feature story in collaboration with The Conversation, the non-profit, independent news organization that carries content from academic experts. “Why You Shouldn’t Neglect Eye Care During the COVID-19 Pandemic” is being distributed to major mainstream news outlets around the globe. The story has already been published by high visibility sources including Yahoo! News, The National Post, and MSN.

“Like many of our peers worldwide, CORE’s optometrists and clinical scientists have been hearing people’s confusion and concerns about their eyes in relation to COVID-19. Addressing the most frequent should help patients and their families maintain healthy vision while remaining safe,” said Dr. Ng. “Through our new infographics and feature story, we hope that eye care professionals will be able to spread the word even further in their communities.”

CORE has been one of the most prominent and cited voices regarding ocular health during the pandemic, including leading efforts in mid-2020 to combat misinformation regarding COVID-19 and contact lens wear. The group was also responsible last year for bringing global professional and consumer attention to mask associated dry eye (MADE). More information regarding these programs and the new initiative are available at COVIDeyefacts.org.

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About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA
McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.434.2150

New Website Dynamically Tracks World’s Top Optometry Researchers

WATERLOO, Ontario, March 5, 2021— Four ocular researchers have developed a dynamic global ranking system to recognize the world’s top 200 optometry researchers. Updated automatically every 24 hours, the Global Optometrist Top 200 Research Rankings are available at optomrankings.com.

Drs. Philip Morgan, Lyndon Jones, Jason Nichols and Nathan Efron, along with programmer George Morgan, created the website based upon a new co-authored paper that was published in Clinical and Experimental Optometry. The paper can be downloaded at: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08164622.2021.1878863

Inclusion on the list is determined through widespread global searches that identify optometrists who have published extensively, in both optometry and other disciplines. All metrics are compiled through a custom tool that accesses the Scopus search engine. Ranking factors include h-index, number of publications, years of active publishing, and number of citations. Individual h-indexes of the top 200 range from 68 to 21, with numbers of published papers as high as 443.

Lyndon Jones, director of the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) at the University of Waterloo, a paper co-author and co-creator of the website, is currently ranked #14. He also ranks fifth among optometrists who have been cited at least 1,000 times in a single year, fifth in the category of most prolific optometrists, and eighth in publication rate.

“It’s quite incredible to see the efforts of researchers with a background in optometry reflected through this new tool, and intriguing to consider the total impact of their work,” said Dr Jones. “While I’m humbled to be among many peers and friends, I am even more enthusiastic to see the growing impact of new research and researchers, helping the field continue to evolve. This publication certainly confirms the fact that optometry is an evidence-based discipline.”

The University of Waterloo ranks fifth among all institutions on the list. In addition to Dr. Jones, the following Waterloo researchers are ranked: Trefford Simpson, Desmond Fonn, Jacob Sivak, Daphne McCulloch, Thomas Freddo, Paul Murphy, Christopher Hudson, Luigina Sorbara, William Bobier and Anthony Cullen.

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About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)

The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS

Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA
McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.434.2150

New Contact Lens Update Focuses on Meibomian Gland Dysfunction

Latest Issue Introduces Case Record Feature that Translates Research Into Clinical Practice

WATERLOO, Ontario, February 18th, 2021—The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has published issue number 58 of its free online education magazine, Contact Lens Update. This edition launches a new case record feature that shares research-relevant yet patient-centred insights as experienced by practicing eye care professionals.

University of Waterloo alumna and president-elect of the Alberta Association of Optometrists in Canada, Andrea Lasby makes two contributions to the issue. Acknowledging the conflicting evidence regarding meibomian gland changes with contact lens use, her feature article reviews a recent publication by Tianpu Gu and colleagues that investigates the potential for meibomian gland changes to distinguish dry eye from normal eyes in young adult wearers.

Andrea is also responsible for Contact Lens Update’s inaugural clinical case record, which she has poignantly dedicated to the late Dr. Luigina Sorbara, her former professor and mentor at the School of Optometry & Vision Science, University of Waterloo.  In a fascinating and clinically applicable illustration, she describes the diagnosis and successful management of her contact lens patient with extremely poor lens comfort and severe evaporative dry eye—gaining a successful outcome without needing to change the type of contact lens worn. Her text book example includes many tips for practitioners, ranging from comprehensive patient education through to proactive use of meibography for early detection and ongoing monitoring of gland changes. 

Andrea Lasby

Understanding the impact of make up on ocular comfort, the tear film and meibomian glands is relevant for many patients. Mariam Alkawally’s poster at the 2020 American Academy of Optometry Annual Meeting (Academy at Home) builds on her preliminary findings presented a year earlier. Linking to her abstract in this issue’s conference highlight helps practitioners appreciate the changes that occur to the ocular surface and meibomian glands when eyeliner is applied to the lid margin.

Mariam Alkawally

Andrew Pucker, assistant professor and chief of the Myopia Control Clinic at the University of Alabama at Birmingham, has both researched and published extensively on the subject of meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD). His topical editorial addresses several commonly asked questions about MGD, weighing the evidence and clinical implications for each.

Andrew Pucker

“With each successive issue, Contact Lens Update delves deeper into the issues and evolving areas of practice being explored and embraced by the eye health community. It’s a privilege to expose new voices, new ideas and best practices to our readers worldwide, adapting our magazine alongside fascinating ocular science advancements,” said Karen Walsh, professional education team leader and clinical scientist at CORE and the editor of Contact Lens Update.

Published six times per year, Contact Lens Update provides a global platform for unbiased clinical insights based in current research. Since 2011, each issue has provided dependable and up-to-date ocular health information for more than 60,000 leading eye care professionals.

In addition to a complete archive of back issues, ContactLensUpdate.com offers a resource library that provides no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images and video. It also houses complimentary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Industry professionals can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues.

The publication receives support from the educational arms of Alcon, CooperVision, and Johnson & Johnson Vision.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

Two CORE Researchers Inducted into ISCLR

WATERLOO, Ontario, January 21, 2021—Two researchers at the Centre for Ocular Research and Education (CORE) at the University of Waterloo have been inducted into the International Society for Contact Lens Research (ISCLR), in recognition of their contribution to the field.

CORE’s William Ngo, OD, PhD, FAAO, head of biosciences and research assistant professor, and Chau-Minh Phan, MSc, PhD, FAAO, research assistant professor, have been invited to join ISCLR, an exclusive honor extended to the top 100 contact lens researchers worldwide. Dr. Ngo and Dr. Phan join an impressive list of a dozen other current and past CORE researchers to enter the society.

Dr. Ngo is experienced in both clinical practice and research, with particular interest and extensive publishing on the study of ocular surface disease and contact lenses. He is also a Fellow of the American Academy of Optometry.

Dr. Phan’s research interests primarily focus on developing biomaterials for ocular drug delivery and in vitro eye models.  In addition to his role at CORE, he is the co-founder of two start-ups, Tricolops Technology and OcuBlink, Inc.

Dr. Lyndon Jones, director of CORE, is a member of ISCLR, as well as the following CORE staff and student alumni: Kathy Dumbleton, Desmond Fonn, Maud Gorbet, Alex Hui, Nancy Keir, Rachael Peterson, Gina Sorbara, Sruthi Srinivasan, Lakshman Subbaraman, Jay Wang, and Craig Woods.

“CORE’s representation in ISCLR speaks to the depth of our contribution to the contact lens field over the last three decades,” says Dr. Jones. “We have a rich history and passion for research. The work our current and former researchers have done—and continue to do around the world whether at CORE or in other roles—has a demonstrable impact on the lives of millions.”

Established in 1978 by a group of leading global researchers, ISCLR is committed to international communication in the field of contact lens research and related sciences. ISCLR hosts a biennial scientific meeting to provide an opportunity for researchers from around the world and members of industry to share and discuss early-stage study developments and factors impacting contact lens success.

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About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA
McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.434.2150

New Contact Lens Update Provides Global View of Eye Care Professional Response During Pandemic

International Panel Shares Clinical Practice Experiences in 2020

WATERLOO, Ontario, December 14, 2020—The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) has published issue number 57 of its free online education magazine, Contact Lens Update. The latest edition looks at the unique events of 2020 through the eyes of ten front line practitioners who have been working with a fast-moving, ever-changing situation to continue delivering patient care.

Representing ten countries, the international panelists work in a number of clinical settings and specialise in several aspects of optometric practice, research and education. They provide fascinating insights into the similarities and differences encountered during the year—and the passion, professionalism and resilience of the eye care profession.

Some of their experiences are explored in depth within the latest edition, including mask design and dry eye.

The feature article provides a visual demonstration of the effect of wearing different types of face masks on the spread of aerosols and droplets from the mouth and nose when speaking, coughing and sneezing. An accompanying video created by Prateek Bahl of USNW Sydney and colleagues shows significant differences in efficacy between different designs of masks.

Mask-associated dry eye (MADE) is addressed in the Clinical Insight. This includes a downloadable graphic available in 32 languages for practitioners to use with patients that explains the phenomenon and simple steps to alleviate it.

The Conference Highlight shows how reported increases in dry eye are not solely confined to adults. A study from Amy Nau,  who divides her time between clinical practice and research, examined the dry eye symptoms in a population of middle and high school students who commenced online home learning during the pandemic.

Published six times per year, Contact Lens Update provides a global platform for unbiased clinical insights based in current research. Since 2011, each issue has provided dependable and up-to-date ocular health information for more than 60,000 leading eye care professionals.

In addition to a complete archive of back issues, ContactLensUpdate.com offers a resource library that provides no-cost professional tools, patient resources, images and video. It also houses complimentary technical training videos produced by International Association of Contact Lens Educators, plus an industry glossary. Industry professionals can access the latest issue directly from ContactLensUpdate.com or quickly sign up for email receipt of future issues.

The publication receives support from the educational arms of Alcon, CooperVision, and Johnson & Johnson Vision.

# # #

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA, McDougall Communications for CORE
aimee@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.414.9838  |  mike@mcdougallpr.com +1.585.545.1815

CORE and Myopia Profile Form Alliance to Expand Clinical Research and Professional Education Capabilities

WATERLOO, CANADA and BRISBANE, AUSTRALIA, November 30, 2020— The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) and Myopia Profile today announced an alliance designed to expand both organizations’ services and reach. This unique venture brings together two groups both at the forefront of research and education in their respective fields. The affiliation will grow CORE’s already extensive clinical research capabilities, adding expertise in specialty lenses, gas permeable, orthokeratology and scleral contact lenses, provide Myopia Profile with priority access to a world-leading clinical research site, and further extend the professional and patient education capabilities for which each team is internationally known, including the areas of myopia management.

The heads of CORE and Myopia Profile—Dr. Lyndon Jones and Drs. Paul and Kate Gifford, respectively—have a multi-decade professional relationship dating back to the mid 1990’s. They have often collaborated on projects, lectures and other initiatives designed to advance ocular health and science.

“Our new alliance is a natural extension of our respect for one another, which has grown into friendship as the years have passed. We have long been aware of synergies in our work, along with areas where we can each extend the capabilities of the other. I’m delighted that the time is right for our respective organizations to take this step, and I am excited to see what we can achieve together,” said Dr. Jones.

“We share many points of view with CORE—clinically and personally—making this partnership a natural evolution of our relationship. Paul and I are delighted to be able to work more closely with the wider team at CORE, and look forward to sharing the results of this joint venture with the profession,” said Dr. Kate Gifford.

CORE and Myopia Profile will maintain their individual identities, facilities and staffing while pursuing projects together.

About Myopia Profile
Myopia Profile is the world’s largest and most popular, multi-channel educational resource dedicated to childhood myopia management. Developed by husband-and-wife optometrist team Drs Paul and Kate Gifford, it was first built around the Clinical Myopia Profile patient communication tool developed by Kate from 15 years’ experience in her Brisbane CBD practice. Starting as a bulk email to share the tool, then a website, then a Facebook group, Myopia Profile has now grown into a thriving, engaged community of many thousands of optometrists around the world, across web and social media platforms. The Myopia Profile team develops internationally accessible professional education, online courses, clinical communication tools and public awareness assets, and has expertise in bespoke industry learning and software solutions, and collaborative translational research. For more information, please visit myopiaprofile.com.

About the Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE)
The Centre for Ocular Research & Education (CORE) – formerly known as the Centre for Contact Lens Research – was established in 1988 at the University of Waterloo’s School of Optometry & Vision Science. Over the next three decades, the organization evolved from a three-person operation into a thriving hub of basic and applied research, collaborating with sponsors, agencies and academia on advanced biosciences, clinical research and education. Its uncompromising independence and results of the highest quality have been at the heart of many of the most prominent advances in eye health. Today, its approximately 50-person team serves a range of ophthalmic sectors, including medical devices, ocular pharmaceuticals, digital technology and others, with a focus on the anterior segment. For more information, please visit core.uwaterloo.ca.

MEDIA CONTACTS
Aimee J. Lewis or Mike McDougall, APR, Fellow PRSA
McDougall Communications for CORE
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