Publications

Showing 18 results out of 43 in total.

Phan,C. M., Shukla,M., Walther,H., Heynen,M., Suh,D., Jones,L. Development of an In Vitro Blink Model for Ophthalmic Drug Delivery Pharmaceutics 2021;13(Article 300):1-10 [ Show Abstract ]

Purpose: The purpose of this study was to develop an advanced in vitro blink model that
can be used to examine the release of a wide variety of components (for example, topical ophthalmic
drugs, comfort-inducing agents) from soft contact lenses. Methods: The model was designed using
computer-aided design software and printed using a stereolithography 3D printer. The eyelid and
eyeball were synthesized from polyvinyl alcohol and silicone material, respectively. Simulated
tear fluid was infused through tubing attached to the eyelid using a syringe pump. With each
blink cycle, the eyelid slides and flexes across the eyeball to create an artificial tear film layer. The
flow-through fluid was collected using a specialized trough. Two contact lenses, etafilcon A and
senofilcon A, were incubated in 2 mL of a water-soluble red dye for 24 h and then placed on the eye
model (n = 3). The release of the dye was measured over 24 h using a tear flow rate of 5 µL/min.
Results: Approximately 25% of the fluid that flowed over the eye model was lost due to evaporation,
nonspecific absorption, and residual dead volume. Senofilcon A absorbed more dye (47.6 ± 2.7 µL)
than etafilcon A (22.3 ± 2.0 µL). For etafilcon A, the release of the dye followed a burst-plateau
profile in the vial but was sustained in the eye model. For senofilcon A, the release of the dye was
sustained in both the vial and the eye model, though more dye was released in the vial (p < 0.05).
Overall, the release of the dye from the contact lenses was higher in the vial compared with the eye
model (p < 0.05). Conclusion: The blink model developed in this study could be used to measure
the release of topical ophthalmic drugs or comfort agents from contact lenses. Simulation of a blink
mechanism, an artificial tear film, and nonspecific absorption in an eye model may provide better
results than a simple, static vial incubation model.

Schulze,M., Ng,A. Y., Yang,M., Panjwani,F., Srinivasan,S., Jones,L., Senchyna,M. Bulbar redness and dry eye disease: comparison of a validated subjective grading scale and an objective automated method Optometry & Vision Science 2021;98(2):113-120 [ Show Abstract ]

SIGNIFICANCE
In this study, assessments of conjunctival redness were performed to evaluate whether patients with or without dry eye disease (DED) could be discriminated based on this measure. Our findings suggest that subjectively grading redness by quadrant, as opposed to automated en face measurements, may be more suitable for this purpose.

PURPOSE
This study aimed to quantify bulbar redness using the validated bulbar redness (VBR) grading scale and an automated objective method (Oculus Keratograph 5M; K5M) in participants with DED and non-DED controls.

METHODS
Participants with DED (Ocular Surface Disease Index score ≥20 and Oxford scale corneal staining ≥2) and controls (Ocular Surface Disease Index score ≤10 and corneal staining ≤1) attended two study visits. In part 1A of visit 1, baseline bulbar redness was graded with the VBR scale in each conjunctival quadrant of both eyes, followed by automated measurements of temporal and nasal redness with the K5M. This was immediately followed by part 1B, during which a topical vasoconstrictor was instilled into both eyes. Redness assessments were repeated 5 and 30 minutes after instillation with both instruments. Participants returned 14 days later for visit 2, where the same assessments as for visit 1A were repeated.

RESULTS
Seventy-four participants (50 DED and 24 controls) completed the study. There were statistically significant differences in redness between the DED and control groups when assessed with the VBR scale (14/16 comparisons; all, P < .05), whereas no significant differences in K5M-derived redness between the DED and non-DED groups were found at any location or time point. Both subjective and objective instruments detected statistically significant reductions in redness 5 and 30 minutes after instillation of the vasoconstrictor (all, P < .01).

CONCLUSIONS
Although both subjective and objective instruments were sensitive to detecting changes in redness induced by vasoconstriction, statistically significant differences in redness between DED and control groups were only found using the VBR scale.

Stapleton,F., Bakkar,M., Carnt,N., Chalmers,R., Kumar Vijay,A., Marasini,S., Ng,A. Y., Tam,J., Wagner,H., Woods,C., Wolffsohn,J. S. CLEAR - Contact lens complications Contact Lens Anterior Eye 2021;44(2):330-367 [ Show Abstract ]

Contact lens-related complications are common, affecting around one third of wearers, although most are mild and easily managed. Contact lenses have well-defined anatomical and physiological effects on the ocular surface and can result in other consequences due to the presence of a biologically active material. A contact lens interacts with the tear film, ocular surface, skin, endogenous and environmental microorganisms, components of care solutions and other antigens which may result in disease specific to contact lens wear, such as metabolic or hypersensitivity disorders. Contact lens wear may also modify the epidemiology or pathophysiology of recognised conditions, such as papillary conjunctivitis or microbial keratitis. Wearers may also present with intercurrent disease, meaning concomitant or pre-existing conditions unrelated to contact lens wear, such as allergic eye disease or blepharitis, which may complicate the diagnosis and management of contact lens-related disease.

Complications can be grouped into corneal infection (microbial keratitis), corneal inflammation (sterile keratitis), metabolic conditions (epithelial: microcysts, vacuoles, bullae, tight lens syndrome, epithelial oedema; stromal: superficial and deep neovascularisation, stromal oedema [striae/folds], endothelial: blebs, polymegethism/ pleomorphism), mechanical (corneal abrasion, corneal erosion, lens binding, warpage/refractive error changes; superior epithelial arcuate lesion, mucin balls, conjunctival epithelial flaps, ptosis, discomfort), toxic and allergic disorders (papillary conjunctivitis, solution-induced corneal staining, incomplete neutralisation of peroxide, Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency), tear resurfacing disorders/dry eye (contact lens-induced dry eye, Meibomian gland dysfunction, lid wiper epitheliopathy, lid parallel conjunctival folds, inferior closure stain, 3 and 9 o'clock stain, dellen, dimple veil) or contact lens discomfort. This report summarises the best available evidence for the classification, epidemiology, pathophysiology, management and prevention of contact lens-related complications in addition to presenting strategies for optimising contact lens wear.

Ulkuseven,E., McCanna,D. J., Subbaraman,L. N., Jones,L. W. The Effect of Antimicrobial Peptides on the Viability of Human Corneal Epithelial Cells Probiotics and Antimicrobial Proteins 2021;13(2):518-526 [ Show Abstract ]

Antimicrobial peptides are polypeptides composed of less than 100 amino acids and are a class of antibiotics with strong activity against some infectious bacteria. This study examined the safety of four chosen antimicrobial peptides using primary human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) and explored their potential therapeutic use. The efficacy of the peptides was also studied by evaluating the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. One of the peptides (polymyxin E) was found to have antibacterial efficacy against a common Gram-negative bacterium (MIC 1.56 μg/mL for Pseudomonas aeruginosa), and another one (nisin) was found to have antibacterial efficacy against a common Gram-positive bacterium (MIC 125 μg/mL for Staphylococcus aureus). Metabolic activity and live/dead/apoptotic effects were measured with fluorescent dyes after HCEC were exposed to the peptides for 30 min. Three of the peptides exhibited lower toxicity against HCEC than a currently marketed eye drop product. Regarding both efficacy and safety, two of the peptides (polymyxin E and nisin) were found to have potential use for treating ocular infections.

Vincent,S. J., Cho,P., Yin Chan,K., Fadel,D., Ghorbani-Mojarrad,N., González-Méijome,J. M., Johnson,L., Michaud,L., Simard,P., Jones,L. CLEAR - Orthokeratology Contact Lens Anterior Eye 2021;44(2):240-269 [ Show Abstract ]

Orthokeratology (ortho-k) is the process of deliberately reshaping the anterior cornea by utilising specialty contact lenses to temporarily and reversibly reduce refractive error after lens removal. Modern ortho-k utilises reverse geometry lens designs, made with highly oxygen permeable rigid materials, worn overnight to reshape the anterior cornea and provide temporary correction of refractive error. More recently, ortho-k has been extensively used to slow the progression of myopia in children.

This report reviews the practice of ortho-k, including its history, mechanisms of refractive and ocular changes, current use in the correction of myopia, astigmatism, hyperopia, and presbyopia, and standard of care. Suitable candidates for ortho-k are described, along with the fitting process, factors impacting success, and the potential options for using newer lens designs. Ocular changes associated with ortho-k, such as alterations in corneal thickness, development of microcysts, pigmented arcs, and fibrillary lines are reviewed. The safety of ortho-k is extensively reviewed, along with an overview of non-compliant behaviours and appropriate disinfection regimens. Finally, the role of ortho-k in myopia management for children is discussed in terms of efficacy, safety, and potential mechanisms of myopia control, including the impact of factors such as initial fitting age, baseline refractive error, the role of peripheral defocus, higher order aberrations, pupil size, and treatment zone size.

Walsh K, Jones L. COVID-19: A year in review and the impact on CL practice Contact Lens Spectrum 2021;36, February: E1-E6 [ Show Abstract ]

For everyone involved in eye care, 2020 was going to be a special year. The numerous “20/20” puns and articles circulating in January were full of hope and future-gazing. No one could have predicted the direction that the year would take and its resulting impact on the world at large and, for this audience specifically, on the delivery of routine contact lens care. As the end of this unprecedented year has finally come to pass, it feels right to pause and reflect on the last 12 months, to examine the journey that the profession has taken, and to summarize the situation. This article reviews what the profession has learned and asks whether enough is known to successfully navigate the months and years ahead. With no small amount of irony and a large nod to those aforementioned puns, does being approximately one year into the pandemic result in having a useful amount of “20/20 hindsight”?

Walsh K, Jones L. Covid-19 and contact lenses: Keeping it simple in the ‘new normal’ Optician 2021, March: 25-30 [ Show Abstract ]

Karen Walsh and Professor Lyndon Jones examine how Covid-19 has affected routine contact lens practice and what that means for both eye care practitioners and their patients (C77595, one distance learning CET point suitable for optometrists, contact lens opticians and dispensing opticians).

In the first quarter of 2020, routine clinical eye care underwent a temporary cessation in most regions around the world due to the coronavirus pandemic. Optometric practice is now predominantly back up and running, albeit with the occasional return to a higher alert level as the infection rates in countries ebb and flow over time. The demands
of working in a world with Covid-19 have necessitated changes to how routine practice is conducted. As a result, the attitudes and needs of eye care practitioners (ECPs) and patients related to eye care in general, and contact lenses (CLs) in particular, may have altered. Within this new shape of optometric practice, the question of where CL practice fits naturally arises. While aftercare for the routine assessment and resupply of existing wearers may seem acceptable, how does the profession approach the option of new fits and upgrades? Given the wider challenges faced by practitioners, is this really the time to focus on such areas? Is it even ‘safe’ to fit CL now, given the close contact required? However, looking at it from a different point of view, are there in fact opportunities arising from the changes dictated by Covid-19 that could be beneficial for CL practice? This article reviews the recommendations
for safe CL practice, looks at their relevance for both practitioners and patients, and addresses how CL can be accommodated into the daily clinic routine as easily as possible.

Walsh K, Sulley A. Soft toric lens fitting practices not meeting patient needs Optometry Times Journal 2021;13, 2: 34-37 [ Show Abstract ]

The inclusion of astigmatic correction in spectacles is common practice. Outside of the need to reduce a high or previously uncorrected astigmatism to ease adaption, eyecare professionals (ECPs) routinely prescribe the full toric correction in spectacles. Historically, the lack of availability of consistently performing, comfortable soft toric contact lens designs resulted in different prescribing practices for astigmats compared to those wearing spectacles, with spherical lenses often recommended over toric lenses for low to moderate levels of astigmatism.

Modern soft toric designs are significantly different from early non-planned replacement versions of 20 or more years ago. Their overall performance—which includes ease of fitting, comfort, rotational stability, vision performance, and consistent manufacturing in a range of designs and materials—enables them to be fit successfully to a wide range of astigmatic patients.

This review provides an overview of current soft toric prescribing, comparing and contrasting different fitting practices around the globe, and explores patient expectations and the opportunities that exist to meet their needs.

Walther,H., Lorentz,H., Heynen,M., Kay,L., Jones,L. W. The Impact of Incubation Conditions on in Vitro Phosphatidylcholine Deposition on Contact Lens Materials Optometry & Vision Science 2021;98(4):341-349 [ Show Abstract ]

SIGNIFICANCE: Previous in vitro measurements of contact lenses commonly investigate the impact of nonpolar
tear film lipids (i.e., sterols). Polar lipids, however, are equally important stabilizing components of the tear film.
This research explores and presents further knowledge about various aspects of polar lipid uptake that may impact
contact lens performance.

PURPOSE: This study evaluated the impact of incubation time, lipid concentration, and replenishment of an artificial
tear solution (ATS) on the uptake of phosphatidylcholine (PC) onto conventional hydrogel (CH) and silicone
hydrogel (SH) contact lens materials.

METHODS: Four SHs and two CH lens materials (n = 4) were soaked in a complex ATS containing radioactive
14C-PC as a probe molecule. Phosphatidylcholine uptake was monitored at various incubation time points (1, 3,
7, 14, and 28 days), with different ATS lipid concentrations (0.5, 1, 2) and with and without regular replenishment
of the ATS. Phosphatidylcholine was extracted from the lenses, processed, and counted by a β counter,
and accumulated PC (μg/lens) was extrapolated from standard lipid calibration curves.

RESULTS: All materials exhibited increasing PC deposition over time. Conventional hydrogel materials showed significantly lower PC uptake rates (P < .001) than any of the SH materials. Increasing lipid concentration in the ATS
resulted in increased PC binding onto the contact lens materials (P < .001). Replenishing the ATS every other day,
however, impacted the PC deposition differently, showing increased binding (P < .001) on CHs and reduced PC
deposition for SH materials (P < .001).

CONCLUSIONS: Length of incubation, lipid concentration in the ATS, and renewal of the incubation solution all
influenced the amount of PC that sorbed onto various lens materials and therefore need to be considered when
conducting future in vitro deposition studies.

Willcox,M., Keir,N., Maseedupallu,V., Masoudi,S., McDermott,A., Mobeen,R., Purslow,C., Santodomingo-Rubio,J., Tavazzi,S., Zeri,F., Jones,L. W. CLEAR - Contact lens wettability, cleaning, disinfection and interactions with tears Contact Lens Anterior Eye 2021;44(2):157-191 [ Show Abstract ]

Contact lens materials have undergone significant changes over the past 20 years, particularly with respect to the introduction of silicone hydrogel materials. Whilst this development addressed hypoxic issues, other important areas relating to contact lens success, notably comfort, require further research.

Contact lens wettability remains a crucially important part of biocompatibility. Contact lenses can be made more wettable by incorporation of surfactants into blister packs, internal wetting agents, surface treatments or care solutions. However, there remains no clear association between contact lens wettability and comfort, making it challenging to determine the potential for these approaches to be of significant clinical benefit. Most contact lenses are used on a daily wear, reusable basis, which requires them to be disinfected when not worn. The ideal disinfecting solution would also improve comfort during wear. However, balancing these requirements with other factors, including biocompatibility, remains a challenge. Soft lens materials invariably take up and subsequently release certain components of disinfecting solutions onto the ocular surface. This may affect tear film stability and the normal ocular microbiome, and further research is needed in this area to determine whether this has any affect on comfort. Finally, contact lens materials sorb components of the tear film, and these interactions are complex and may change the biochemistry of the tear film, which in turn may affect their comfort.

In conclusion, the interaction between lens materials, tear film and disinfection solution plays an important role in the biocompatibility of lenses. However, the exact role and whether this can be altered to improve biocompatibility and comfort during wear remains debatable. This report summarises the best available evidence to examine this complex relationship and the opportunities for practitioners to enhance in-eye comfort of contemporary lenses, along with providing suggestions for areas of study that may provide further information on this topic.

Williams R, Srinivasan S, Jones L. Career Transitions ARVO Advance Research Career Development Conference, Virtual Conference, February 26, 2021

Wolffsohn,J. S., Dumbleton,K., Huntjens,B., Kandel,H., Koh,S., Kunnen,C. M. E., Nagra,M., Pult,H., Sulley,A. L., Vianya-Estopa,M., Walsh,K., Wong,S., Stapleton,F. CLEAR - Evidence-based contact lens practice Contact Lens Anterior Eye 2021;44(2):368-397 [ Show Abstract ]

Evidence-based contact lens -->practice involves finding, appraising and applying research findings as the basis for patient management decisions. These decisions should be informed by the strength of the research study designs that address the question, as well as by the experience of the practitioner and the preferences and environment of the patient. This reports reviews and summarises the published research evidence that is available to inform soft and rigid contact lens history and symptoms taking, anterior eye health examination (including the optimised use of ophthalmic dyes, grading scales, imaging techniques and lid eversion), considerations for contact lens selection (including the ocular surface measurements required to select the most appropriate lens parameter, lens modality and material selection), evaluation of lens fit, prescribing (teaching self-application and removal, adaptation, care regimen and cleaning instructions, as well as -->minimising risks of lens wear through encouraging compliance) and an aftercare routine.

Wolffsohn,J. S., Morgan,P. B., Barnett,M., Downie,L. E., Jacobs,D. S. Jones,L. W., Richdale, K., Stapleton,F., Vincent,S. J., Willcox,M. Contact Lens Evidence-Based Academic Reports (CLEAR) Contact Lens Anterior Eye 2021;44(2):129-131 [ Show Abstract ]

Since contact lenses were invented in 1887, innovations have included advances in optical design, material, care systems, wear modality, lens size, lens shape and applications. Over 19,000 peer reviewed academic papers on the contact lenses have been published. The Contact Lens Evidence-based Academic Reports (CLEAR) follow the exemplary work of organisations such as the Tear Film and Ocular Surface Society dry eye, meibomian gland disease, contact lens discomfort and dry eye II workshops and the International Myopia Institute white papers on myopia control, in collating and appraising the academic literature in an ocular field of interest. CLEAR represent the work of nearly 100 multidisciplinary experts in the field, who set out to critically review, synthesise and summarise the research evidence on contact lenses to date; this serves to inform both clinical practice, manufacturing innovation and future research directions.

Woods,J., Jones,D., Jones,L., Jones,S., Hunt,C., Chamberlain,P., McNally,J Ocular health of children wearing daily disposable contact lenses over a 6-year period Contact Lens Anterior Eye 2021;Online ahead of print [ Show Abstract ]

Purpose
To report on the ocular health and safety of children fit with soft hydrogel daily-disposable contact lenses, and followed for 6-years in a double-masked clinical trial investigating the performance of a dual-focus contact lens designed to control myopia progression.

Methods
Children aged 8−12 years, naïve to contact lens wear, were enrolled across four international sites. During years 1–3, children were randomised to either MiSight® 1 day or Proclear® 1 day (both omafilcon A, CooperVision, Inc.). The lenses were identical in material and geometry except for the front optical zone design. At the end of year-3, all those wearing Proclear 1 day were switched to MiSight 1 day, therefore all wore MiSight 1 day in years 4−6. Subjects agreed to wear the lenses at least 10-hours/day, 6-days/week. After dispensing, study visits were at 1-week, 1-month, 6-months and every 6-months until 6-years. At each visit, ocular measurements and subjective responses were recorded. Biomicroscopy used 0–4 grading scales; grade 0 represented no findings.

Results
144 children were enrolled: 69F:75M; mean age 10.1 years; mean cycloplegic spherical-equivalent refraction -2.11D; ethnicities included 34 East-Asian, 12 West-Asian, and 79 Caucasian. 92 completed the 6-years. Only three subjects discontinued due to an ocular adverse event (AE). No contact lens related AEs were classified as serious. The incidence rate of infiltrative AEs was 0.61% (6.1/1000 wearing-years; 95%CI: 0.24%–1.57%). The most common biomicroscopy findings were limbal, bulbar and tarsal hyperaemia and tarsal roughness. 99% of all biomicroscopy findings were grade-1 or lower. After 6-years of lens wear, ocular health by biomicroscopy was similar to pre-lens wear.

Conclusions
Across the 6-years, there were no contact lens related serious AEs and biomicroscopy showed no significant changes. Results suggest that children this age can successfully wear daily-disposable hydrogel contact lenses with minimal impact on ocular physiology.

Xu,M., Sivak,J. G., McCanna,D. J. Neutralization of the eye and skin irritant benzalkonium chloride using UVC radiation Cutaneous and Ocular Toxicology 2021;Online ahead of print [ Show Abstract ]

Benzalkonium chloride (BAK) is a widely used disinfectant and preservative which is effective against a wide range of viruses (e.g. SARS-CoV and SARS-CoV-2), bacteria and fungi. However, it is toxic to the eye and skin. This study investigated the neutralization of BAK using ultraviolet C (UVC) radiation as an effort to reduce BAK toxicity potential.

Methods
BAK solutions were irradiated with a germicidal UVC lamp at various doses. Human corneal epithelial cells (HCEC) were then exposed to the UVC-irradiated BAK solutions for 5 minutes. After exposure, the cultures were assessed for metabolic activity using PrestoBlue; for cell viability using confocal microscopy with viability dyes; and for tight junction proteins using immunofluorescence staining for zonula occludens (ZO)-1.

Results
UVC radiation reduced BAK toxicity on cell metabolic activity in a dose-dependent manner. When the solution depth of BAK was 1.7 mm, the UVC doses needed to completely neutralize the toxicity of BAK 0.005% and 0.01% were 2.093 J/cm2 and 8.374 J/cm2, respectively. The cultures treated with UVC-neutralized BAK showed similar cell metabolic activity and cell viability to those treated with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (p = 0.806 ∼ 1.000). The expression of ZO-1 was greatly disturbed by untreated BAK; in contrast, ZO-1 proteins were well maintained after exposure to UVC-neutralized BAK.

Conclusions
Our study demonstrates that the cell toxicity of BAK can be neutralized by UVC radiation, which provides a unique way of detoxifying BAK residues. This finding may be of great value in utilizing the antimicrobial efficacy of BAK (e.g. fighting against SARS-CoV-2) while minimizing its potential hazards to human health and the environment.

Yamasaki,K., Mizuno,Y., Kitamura,Y., McCanna,D. J., Ngo,W., Jones,L. W. The efficacy of povidone-iodine, hydrogen peroxide and a chemical multipurpose contact lens care system against Pseudomonas aeruginosa on various lens case surfaces Cont Lens Anterior Eye 2021;44(1):18-23 [ Show Abstract ]

Purpose
To determine the antimicrobial efficacy of a povidone-iodine system (PVP-I; cleadew, OPHTECS Corporation, Kobe, Japan), a peroxide system (AOSEPT Plus with HydraGlyde, Alcon, Fort Worth, TX), and a chemical multipurpose system (renu fresh, Bausch & Lomb, Rochester, NY) on contact lens case surfaces that are both in contact and not in contact with the solutions during lens disinfection.

Methods
The surfaces of the inner walls, underside of the lid, and lens holder (if applicable) of the cases were inoculated with P. aeruginosa ATCC 27853. The cases were disinfected with the solutions as per their manufacturer instructions. After disinfection, the inoculated surfaces were swabbed and the amount of surviving P. aeruginosa was determined. Following this experiment, separate cases were inoculated and disinfected as before. This time the cases were agitated after recommended disinfection time and the amount of P. aeruginosa in the disinfecting solution was quantified immediately, and again after resting for 7 days. Experiments were conducted in triplicate (n = 3).

Results
Units are expressed in log CFU. All three solutions significantly reduced P. aeruginosa on direct-contact surfaces (all p < 0.039). On non-contact surfaces, the reduction of P. aeruginosa in the PVP-I system (pre-disinfection: 6.8 ± 0.5, post-disinfection: 1.0 ± 0.0; p < 0.001) was significant, but not for the hydrogen peroxide system (pre-disinfection: 6.3 ± 0.6, post: 5.5 ± 0.5; p = 0.194) and the chemical multipurpose system (pre-disinfection: 6.6 ± 0.1, post-disinfection: 5.6 ± 0.8; p = 0.336). After 7 days post-disinfection, no P. aeruginosa regrowth was observed in the PVP-I system (Day 1: 1.0 ± 0.0, Day 7: 1.0 ± 0.0; p = 1) and the chemical multipurpose system (Day 1: 4.2 ± 0.2, Day 7: 1.8 ± 0.9; p = 0.012), however regrowth was observed in the hydrogen peroxide system (Day 1: 3.4 ± 0.6, Day 7: 6.1 ± 0.4; p = 0.003).

Conclusion
The PVP-I system was more effective against P. aeruginosa on non-contact surfaces than the hydrogen peroxide system or the chemical multipurpose system and is capable of inhibiting regrowth of P. aeruginosa for at least 7 days post-disinfection.

Yee,A., Chan,V., Heynen,M., Phan,C. M., Jones,L. Uptake and release of a multipurpose solution biocide (MAP-D) from hydrogel and silicone hydrogel contact lenses using a radiolabel methodology Eye & Contact Lens 2021;47(5):249-255 [ Show Abstract ]

Purpose:
The purpose of this study was to evaluate the uptake and release of radiolabelled myristamidopropyl dimethylamine (MAP-D) on reusable daily wear contact lenses (CLs) over 7 days.

Methods:
Three silicone hydrogel (SH) CL materials (lotrafilcon B, balafilcon A, senofilcon A) and two conventional hydrogel (CH) materials (etafilcon A, omafilcon A) were tested. A short-term (experiment 1, N=4) and a longer-term (experiment 2, N=3) study was conducted. In experiment 1, the CLs were incubated in 2 mL of phosphate buffered solution (PBS) containing 14C MAP-D (5 μg/mL) for 8 hrs. The release of 14C MAP-D was measured at t=0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hr in PBS. In experiment 2, the CLs were incubated in the 14C MAP-D solution for 8 hrs followed by a 16-hr release in PBS. This cycle was repeated daily for 7 days. At the end of both experiments, lenses were extracted to determine the total uptake of MAP-D. The radioactivity was measured using a beta scintillation counter.

Results:
In experiment 1, all three SH lenses sorbed similar amounts of MAP-D (P=0.99), all of which were higher than the two CH materials (P<0.01). However, the CH materials released a greater amount of MAP-D than the SH materials (P<0.01). In experiment 2, the uptake of MAP-D in SH materials increased over 7 days, whereas the amount of MAP-D remained constant in the CH materials (P=0.99). Similar to experiment 1, the CH lenses released more MAP-D than SH lenses after 7 days (P<0.01).

Conclusion:
The SH materials absorbed greater amounts of MAP-D compared to CH materials. However, the CH materials released the greatest amount of MAP-D. Radioactive labelling of MAP-D offers a highly sensitive method of assessing the uptake and release profiles of biocides to CL materials.

Yee,A., Walsh,K., Schulze,M., Jones,L The impact of patient behaviour and care system compliance on reusable soft contact lens complications Contact Lens Anterior Eye 2021;Online ahead of print [ Show Abstract ]

Reusable soft daily wear contact lenses (CLs) remain popular and were fit to just over half of all wearers in the most recent international CL prescribing survey. Unlike daily disposable CLs, reusables require cleaning and disinfecting after every use, along with storage in a CL case. These additional requirements add a number of steps to the daily wear and care routine, increasing the opportunities for CL wearers to exhibit non-compliant behaviour. The impact of non-compliance ranges from poor lens comfort through to potentially sight- threatening infective keratitis. The coronavirus pandemic has refocused the profession on the importance of hand hygiene in particular, and the need for promoting safe CL wear in general. This review summarises typical non-compliant behaviour related to reusable CLs, and examines strategies and opportunities to better support wearers. Patient education has a central role in encouraging compliant behaviour, although patient recall of information is low, and personal belief systems may result in continuation of non-compliant behaviour despite awareness of the risks. CL care solutions are required for the daily disinfection of lenses, however misuse of multipurpose solutions (MPS) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-based care systems can challenge their ability to be fully efficacious. Standard efficacy testing is reviewed, with consideration of how well current protocols model real-world use of CL solutions. Although some recommendations are in place for the inclusion of additional variables such as lens cases, CL materials, organic soil and efficacy against Acanthamoeba, opportunity still exists to reevaluate global standards to ensure consistency of testing in all markets. Finally, potential future innovations are discussed which may further support increased safety in reusable lens wear through novel antimicrobial additions to both CL materials and cases